AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 18, Issue 9, pp 1694–1700

Willingness to Use HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among Opiate Users

Original Paper

Abstract

Few studies of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV infection have focused on drug users. Between February to September 2013, we asked 351 opiate injectors entering detoxification treatment about HIV risk, knowledge about PrEP, and willingness to use a once daily PrEP pill under one of two randomly assigned effectiveness scenarios—40 % (low) or 90 % (high) effective in reducing HIV risk. Participants were 70 % male and 87 % non-Hispanic White. Only 7 % had heard of a drug to reduce HIV risk, yet once informed, 47 % would be willing to take such a pill [35 % of those in the low effectiveness scenario and 58 % in the high group (p < 0.001)]. Higher perceived HIV risk was associated with greater willingness to take medication. Increasing knowledge of PrEP and the rate of HIV reduction-effectiveness promised will influence its use among targeted high-risk drug users.

Keywords

Pre-exposure prophylaxis PrEP HIV/AIDS Injection drug use 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Stein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Portia Thurmond
    • 1
    • 3
  • Genie Bailey
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.General Medicine Research Unit, Butler HospitalAlpert School of Medicine at Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Stanley Street Treatment and Resources, Inc.Fall RiverUSA

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