AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 18, Issue 7, pp 1378–1380 | Cite as

Whoonga and the Abuse and Diversion of Antiretrovirals in Soweto, South Africa

  • Kathryn Rough
  • Janan Dietrich
  • Thandekile Essien
  • David J. Grelotti
  • David R. Bansberg
  • Glenda Gray
  • Ingrid T. Katz
Brief Report

Abstract

Media reports have described recreational use of HIV antiretroviral medication in South Africa, but little has been written about this phenomenon in the scientific literature. We present original, qualitative data from eight semi-structured interviews that characterize recreational antiretroviral use in Soweto, South Africa. Participants reported that antiretrovirals, likely efavirenz, are crushed, mixed with illicit drugs (in a mixture known as whoonga), and smoked. They described medications being stolen from patients and expressed concern that antiretroviral abuse jeopardized the safety of both patients and users. Further studies are needed to understand the prevalence, patterns, and consequences of antiretroviral abuse and diversion.

Keywords

Antiretroviral diversion Recreational antiretroviral abuse Whoonga Efavirenz South Africa 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn Rough
    • 1
    • 2
  • Janan Dietrich
    • 3
  • Thandekile Essien
    • 3
  • David J. Grelotti
    • 1
  • David R. Bansberg
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Glenda Gray
    • 3
  • Ingrid T. Katz
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Women’s HealthBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Perinatal HIV Research UnitSowetoSouth Africa
  4. 4.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global HealthBostonUSA
  6. 6.Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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