AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 18, Issue 8, pp 1501–1510

Factors Affecting Linkage to Care and Engagement in Care for Newly Diagnosed HIV-Positive Adolescents Within Fifteen Adolescent Medicine Clinics in the United States

  • Morgan M. Philbin
  • Amanda E. Tanner
  • Anna DuVal
  • Jonathan M. Ellen
  • Jiahong Xu
  • Bill Kapogiannis
  • Jim Bethel
  • J. Dennis Fortenberry
  • The Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-013-0650-6

Cite this article as:
Philbin, M.M., Tanner, A.E., DuVal, A. et al. AIDS Behav (2014) 18: 1501. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0650-6

Abstract

Early linkage to care and engagement in care are critical for initiation of medical interventions. However, over 50 % of newly diagnosed persons do not receive HIV-related care within 6 months of diagnosis. We evaluated a linkage to care and engagement in care initiative for HIV-positive adolescents in 15 U.S.-based clinics. Structural and client-level factors (e.g. demographic and behavioral characteristics, clinic staff and location) were evaluated as predictors of successful linkage and engagement. Within 32 months, 1,172/1,679 (69.8 %) of adolescents were linked to care of which 1,043/1,172 (89 %) were engaged in care. Only 62.1 % (1,043/1,679) of adolescents were linked and engaged in care. Linkage to care failure was attributed to adolescent, provider, and clinic-specific factors. Many adolescents provided incomplete data during the linkage process or failed to attend appointments, both associated with failure to linkage to care. Additional improvements in HIV care will require creative approaches to coordinated data sharing, as well as continued outreach services to support newly diagnosed adolescents.

Keywords

Adolescents HIV Linkage to care Engagement in care 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morgan M. Philbin
    • 1
  • Amanda E. Tanner
    • 2
  • Anna DuVal
    • 3
  • Jonathan M. Ellen
    • 4
  • Jiahong Xu
    • 5
  • Bill Kapogiannis
    • 6
  • Jim Bethel
    • 5
  • J. Dennis Fortenberry
    • 7
  • The Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions
  1. 1.HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral StudiesColumbia University, New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Public Health EducationUniversity of North Carolina GreensboroGreensboroUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics, All Children’s Hospital, Johns Hopkins MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineSt. PetersburgUSA
  5. 5.WestatRockvilleUSA
  6. 6.Pediatric, Adolescent and Maternal AIDS Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  7. 7.Department of PediatricsIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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