AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 111–119

HIV Risk Among Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women (MSMW): Findings from South Florida

  • M. Reuel Friedman
  • Steven P. Kurtz
  • Mance E. Buttram
  • Chongyi Wei
  • Anthony J. Silvestre
  • Ron Stall
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-013-0495-z

Cite this article as:
Friedman, M.R., Kurtz, S.P., Buttram, M.E. et al. AIDS Behav (2014) 18: 111. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0495-z

Abstract

Compared with men who have sex with men only (MSMO), men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) consistently report higher rates of two HIV risk behaviors: transactional sex (TS) and concurrent substance use and sex (CSS). Within MSMW, little is known about how synergistic epidemics (“syndemics”) affect TS and CSS. Using a sample of substance-using MSM (n = 515) in South Florida, we compared TS and CSS among MSMO and MSMW; examined whether, within MSMW (n = 86), TS and CSS predict unprotected anal intercourse with partners of serodiscordant/unknown HIV status (SU-UAI); and tested whether syndemics predict TS and CSS. MSMW reported higher rates of engaging in both TS and CSS (AOR = 1.7; 95 % CI 1.0–3.0). Within MSMW, engagement in both TS and CSS predicted SU-UAI (AOR = 3.3; 95 % CI 1.2–9.6); and syndemics predicted TS and CSS involvement (p < 0.01). Substance-using MSMW may benefit from interventions targeting TS, CSS, and background syndemics.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS Bisexuality Transactional sex Concurrent substance use and sex Syndemics 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Reuel Friedman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Steven P. Kurtz
    • 3
  • Mance E. Buttram
    • 3
  • Chongyi Wei
    • 4
  • Anthony J. Silvestre
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ron Stall
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Infectious Diseases and MicrobiologyGraduate School of Public Health, University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Center for LGBT Health Research, Graduate School of Public Health, University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Center for Applied Research on Substance Use and Health Disparities, Nova Southeastern UniversityCoral GablesUSA
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology & BiostatisticsSchool of Medicine, University of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  5. 5.Department of Behavioral and Community Health SciencesGraduate School of Public Health, University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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