AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 889–899

Correlates of Unprotected Vaginal or Anal Intercourse with Women Among Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men

  • Emily Greene
  • Victoria Frye
  • Gordon Mansergh
  • Grant N. Colfax
  • Sharon M. Hudson
  • Stephen A. Flores
  • Donald R. Hoover
  • Sebastian Bonner
  • Beryl A. Koblin
Original Paper

Abstract

The role men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) play in heterosexual HIV transmission is not well understood. We analyzed baseline data from Project MIX, a behavioral intervention study of substance-using men who have sex with men (MSM), and identified correlates of unprotected vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or both with women (UVAI). Approximately 10 % (n = 194) of the men reported vaginal sex, anal sex, or both with a woman; of these substance-using MSMW, 66 % (129) reported UVAI. Among substance-using MSMW, multivariate analyses found unemployment relative to full/part-time employment (OR = 2.28; 95 % CI 1.01, 5.17), having a primary female partner relative to no primary female partner (OR = 3.44; CI 1.4, 8.46), and higher levels of treatment optimism (OR = 1.73; 95 % CI 1.18, 2.54) increased odds of UVAI. Strong feelings of connection to a same-race gay community (OR = 0.71; 95 % CI 0.56, 0.91) and Viagra use (OR = 0.31; 95 % CI 0.10, 0.95) decreased odds of UVAI. This work suggests that although the proportion of substance-using MSM who also have sex with women is low, these men engage in unprotected sex with women, particularly with primary female partners. This work highlights the need for further research with the substance using MSMW population to inform HIV prevention interventions specifically for MSMW.

Keywords

Bisexual Heterosexual HIV MSMW Condom usage 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Greene
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victoria Frye
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gordon Mansergh
    • 4
  • Grant N. Colfax
    • 5
  • Sharon M. Hudson
    • 6
  • Stephen A. Flores
    • 4
  • Donald R. Hoover
    • 7
  • Sebastian Bonner
    • 8
  • Beryl A. Koblin
    • 9
  1. 1.Laboratory of Social and Behavioral SciencesLindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyMailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Sociomedical SciencesMailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Division of HIV/AIDS PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  5. 5.San Francisco Department of Public HealthSan FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.Health Research AssociationLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Department of Statistics and Biostatistics and Institute for Health Care Policy and Aging ResearchRutgers University, The State University of New JerseyPiscatawayUSA
  8. 8.Independent ConsultantNew YorkUSA
  9. 9.Laboratory of Infectious Disease PreventionLindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood CenterNew YorkUSA

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