AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 1873–1882

Do Safer Sex Self-Efficacy, Attitudes toward Condoms, and HIV Transmission Risk Beliefs Differ among Men who Have Sex with Men, Heterosexual Men, and Women Living with HIV?

  • Laura Widman
  • Carol E. Golin
  • Catherine A. Grodensky
  • Chirayath Suchindran
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-011-0108-7

Cite this article as:
Widman, L., Golin, C.E., Grodensky, C.A. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 1873. doi:10.1007/s10461-011-0108-7

Abstract

To understand sexual decision-making processes among people living with HIV, we compared safer sex self-efficacy, condom attitudes, sexual beliefs, and rates of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse with at-risk partners (UAVI-AR) in the past 3 months among 476 people living with HIV: 185 men who have sex with men (MSM), 130 heterosexual men, and 161 heterosexual women. Participants were enrolled in SafeTalk, a randomized, controlled trial of a safer sex intervention. We found 15% of MSM, 9% of heterosexual men, and 12% of heterosexual women engaged in UAVI-AR. Groups did not differ in self-efficacy or sexual attitudes/beliefs. However, the associations between these variables and UAVI-AR varied within groups: greater self-efficacy predicted less UAVI-AR for MSM and women, whereas more positive condom attitudes—but not self-efficacy—predicted less UAVI-AR for heterosexual men. These results suggest HIV prevention programs should tailor materials to different subgroups.

Keywords

HIV transmission risk behavior Self-efficacy Safer sex attitudes Condom attitudes Sexual behavior 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura Widman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carol E. Golin
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Catherine A. Grodensky
    • 4
  • Chirayath Suchindran
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Gillings School of Global Public HealthUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services ResearchUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  5. 5.University of North Carolina Center for AIDS ResearchChapel HillUSA
  6. 6.Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public HealthUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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