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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 1584–1588 | Cite as

Relationship Dynamics as Predictors of Broken Agreements About Outside Sexual Partners: Implications for HIV Prevention Among Gay Couples

  • Anu Manchikanti GomezEmail author
  • Sean C. Beougher
  • Deepalika Chakravarty
  • Torsten B. Neilands
  • Carmen Gomez Mandic
  • Lynae A. Darbes
  • Colleen C. Hoff
Brief Report

Abstract

Agreements about sex with outside partners are common among gay couples, and breaks in these agreements can be indicative of HIV risk. Using longitudinal survey data from both partners in 263 HIV-negative and -discordant gay couples, we investigate whether relationship dynamics are associated with broken agreements. Twenty-three percent of respondents reported broken agreements. Partners with higher levels of trust, communication, commitment, and social support were significantly less likely to report breaking their agreement. Promoting positive relationship dynamics as part of HIV prevention interventions for gay couples provides the opportunity to minimize the occurrence of broken agreements and, ultimately, reduce HIV risk.

Keywords

Gay couples HIV risk Sexual agreements Relationships Relationship dynamics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors extend their thanks to the study participants for their time and effort. This research was supported by Grant R01 MH 75598 from the National Institute of Mental Health.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anu Manchikanti Gomez
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sean C. Beougher
    • 1
  • Deepalika Chakravarty
    • 1
    • 2
  • Torsten B. Neilands
    • 2
  • Carmen Gomez Mandic
    • 1
  • Lynae A. Darbes
    • 2
  • Colleen C. Hoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Research on Gender and SexualitySan Francisco State UniversitySan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Center for AIDS Prevention StudiesUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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