AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 1243–1250 | Cite as

Continued High Risk Sexual Behavior Following Diagnosis with Acute HIV Infection in South Africa and Malawi: Implications for Prevention

  • Audrey Pettifor
  • Catherine MacPhail
  • Amy Corneli
  • Jabu Sibeko
  • Gift Kamanga
  • Nora Rosenberg
  • William C. Miller
  • Irving Hoffman
  • Helen Rees
  • Myron S. Cohen
  • NIAID Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology
Original Paper

Abstract

Understanding sexual behavior following diagnosis of acute HIV infection (AHI) is key to developing prevention programs targeting individuals diagnosed with AHI. We conducted separate qualitative and quantitative interviews with individuals newly diagnosed (n = 19) with AHI at 1-, 4- and 12-weeks post-diagnosis and one qualitative interview with individuals who had previously been diagnosed with AHI (n = 18) in Lilongwe, Malawi and Johannesburg, South Africa between October 2007 and June 2008. The majority of participants reported engaging in sexual activity following diagnosis with AHI with a significant minority reporting unprotected sex during this time. Most participants perceived to have changed their behavior following diagnosis. However, participants reported barriers to condom use and abstinence, in particular, long term relationships and the need for disclosure of sero-status. Understanding of increased infectiousness during AHI was limited. Participants reported a desire for a behavioral intervention at the time of AHI diagnosis, however, there were differences by country in the types of interventions participants found acceptable. Studies are underway to determine the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of interventions designed for individuals with AHI.

Keywords

HIV Africa Sexual behavior Condom use 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey Pettifor
    • 1
    • 2
  • Catherine MacPhail
    • 2
  • Amy Corneli
    • 3
  • Jabu Sibeko
    • 2
  • Gift Kamanga
    • 4
  • Nora Rosenberg
    • 1
  • William C. Miller
    • 1
    • 5
  • Irving Hoffman
    • 5
  • Helen Rees
    • 2
  • Myron S. Cohen
    • 1
    • 5
  • NIAID Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Reproductive Health and HIV Research UnitUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  3. 3.Family Health InternationalDurhamUSA
  4. 4.UNC Project MalawiLilongweMalawi
  5. 5.Division of Infectious Diseases, School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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