AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 1198–1202 | Cite as

Acceptability of Infant Male Circumcision as Part of HIV Prevention and Male Reproductive Health Efforts in Gaborone, Botswana, and Surrounding Areas

  • Rebeca M. Plank
  • Joseph Makhema
  • Poloko Kebaabetswe
  • Fatima Hussein
  • Chiapo Lesetedi
  • Daniel Halperin
  • Barbara Bassil
  • Roger Shapiro
  • Shahin Lockman
Report

Abstract

Adult male circumcision reduces a man’s risk for heterosexual HIV acquisition. Infant circumcision is safer, easier and less costly but not widespread in southern Africa. Questionnaires were administered to sixty mothers of newborn boys in Botswana: 92% responded they would circumcise if the procedure were available in a clinical setting, primarily to prevent future HIV infection, and 85% stated the infant’s father must participate in the decision. Neonatal male circumcision appears to be acceptable in Botswana and deserves urgent attention in resource-limited regions with high HIV prevalence, with the aim to expand services in safe, culturally acceptable and sustainable ways.

Keywords

Neonatal Infant Male circumcision Acceptability Botswana HIV Prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebeca M. Plank
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joseph Makhema
    • 2
  • Poloko Kebaabetswe
    • 4
  • Fatima Hussein
    • 5
  • Chiapo Lesetedi
    • 5
    • 6
  • Daniel Halperin
    • 7
  • Barbara Bassil
    • 8
  • Roger Shapiro
    • 2
    • 3
    • 9
  • Shahin Lockman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Infectious DiseasesBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Botswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative for HIV Research and EducationGaboroneBotswana
  3. 3.Department of Immunology and Infectious DiseasesHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  4. 4.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botswana, USA (BOTUSA)GaboroneBotswana
  5. 5.Botswana National Ministry of HealthGaboroneBotswana
  6. 6.Princess Marina Hospital Department of SurgeryGaboroneBotswana
  7. 7.Department of Global Health and PopulationHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  8. 8.BostonUSA
  9. 9.Division of Infectious DiseasesBeth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterBostonUSA

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