AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 401–409

Acculturation, Coping Styles, and Health Risk Behaviors Among HIV Positive Latinas

  • Mónica Sánchez
  • Eric Rice
  • Judith Stein
  • Norweeta G. Milburn
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9618-y

Cite this article as:
Sánchez, M., Rice, E., Stein, J. et al. AIDS Behav (2010) 14: 401. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9618-y

Abstract

This study examined the relationships among acculturation, coping styles, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and medication non-adherence among 219 Latinas living with HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles, CA. Coping styles were hypothesized to mediate the link between acculturation and health risk behaviors for HIV positive Latinas. Structural equation modeling revealed that greater acculturation was related to less positive coping and more negative coping. In turn, negative coping was associated with more health risk behaviors and more non-adherence. Positive coping was associated with less substance use as reflected in use of cigarettes and alcohol and less non-adherence. Coping styles mediated the relationship between acculturation and health risk behaviors. Findings echo previous works examining the Hispanic Health Paradox wherein more acculturated Latinos exhibit increased risk behavior and maladaptive coping styles. HIV/AIDS interventions need to be mindful of cultural differences within Hispanic populations and be tailored to address these differences.

Keywords

Acculturation Coping styles Latinas HIV/AIDS Hispanic 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mónica Sánchez
    • 1
  • Eric Rice
    • 2
  • Judith Stein
    • 3
  • Norweeta G. Milburn
    • 4
  • Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus
    • 4
  1. 1.Frances L. Hiatt School of PsychologyClark UniversityWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.School of Social WorkUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California-Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesSemel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior Center for Community Health at University of California-Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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