AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 576–583

Sexual Risk and Substance Use Behaviors Among African American Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women

  • Don Operario
  • Carla Dillard Smith
  • Emily Arnold
  • Susan Kegeles
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-009-9588-0

Cite this article as:
Operario, D., Smith, C.D., Arnold, E. et al. AIDS Behav (2011) 15: 576. doi:10.1007/s10461-009-9588-0

Abstract

African American men who have sex with men and women (MSMW), but who do not form a sexual identity around same-sex behavior, may experience risk for HIV infection and transmission. This paper reports cross-sectional survey findings on sexual behaviors and substance use of urban non-gay- or non-bisexual-identified African American MSMW (n = 68), who completed behavior assessment surveys using audio-computer assisted self-interviewing technology. Overall, 17.6% reported being HIV-positive. In the past 3 months, 70.6% had unprotected insertive sex with a female, 51.5% had unprotected insertive anal sex (UIAS) with a male, 33.8% had unprotected receptive anal sex (URAS) with a male, 25% had UIAS with a transgender female, and 10.3% had URAS with a transgender female. Findings indicated a bridging potential for HIV and sexually transmitted infections across groups, such that 38.2% reported concurrent unprotected sex with female and male partners and 17.6% reported concurrent unprotected sex with female and transgender female partners. In the past 3 months, 70.6% used alcohol before sex and 85% used drugs before sex. Men who used drugs before sex had a tenfold increased likelihood for unprotected sex with male partners, and men who injected drugs had a nearly fivefold increased likelihood for unprotected sex with a transgender female. Interventions to address sexual risk behaviors, especially partner concurrency, and substance use behavior for these men are warranted.

Keywords

African American Men MSMW HIV Substance use Risk behavior 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Operario
    • 1
  • Carla Dillard Smith
    • 2
  • Emily Arnold
    • 3
  • Susan Kegeles
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Community HealthBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.CAL-PEPOaklandUSA
  3. 3.Center for AIDS Prevention StudiesUniversity of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

Personalised recommendations