AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 639–648 | Cite as

An Exploratory Behavioral Intervention Trial to Improve Rates of Screening for AIDS Clinical Trials Among Racial/Ethnic Minority and Female Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

  • Marya Viorst Gwadz
  • Keith Cylar
  • Noelle R. Leonard
  • Marion Riedel
  • Nina Herzog
  • Gricel N. Arredondo
  • Charles M. Cleland
  • Michael Aguirre
  • Ann Marshak
  • Donna Mildvan
  • The Project ACT Collaborative Study Team
Original Research

Abstract

Individuals from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds and women have not been proportionately represented in AIDS clinical trials (ACTs). There have been few intervention efforts to eliminate this health disparity. This paper reports on a brief behavioral intervention to increase rates of screening for ACTs in these groups. The study was exploratory and used a single-group pre/posttest design. A total of 580 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) were recruited (39% female; 56% African-American, 32% Latino/Hispanic). The intervention was efficacious: 25% attended screening. We identified the primary junctures where PLHA are lost in the screening process. Both group intervention sessions and an individual contact were associated with screening. Findings provide preliminary support for the intervention’s efficacy and the utility of combining group and individual intervention formats. Interventions of greater duration and intensity, and which address multiple levels of influence (e.g., social, structural), may be needed to increase screening rates further.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS clinical trials Behavioral intervention Screening Gender disparities Racial/ethnic disparities Motivational interviewing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marya Viorst Gwadz
    • 1
  • Keith Cylar
    • 2
  • Noelle R. Leonard
    • 1
  • Marion Riedel
    • 3
  • Nina Herzog
    • 4
  • Gricel N. Arredondo
    • 1
  • Charles M. Cleland
    • 1
  • Michael Aguirre
    • 5
  • Ann Marshak
    • 5
  • Donna Mildvan
    • 5
  • The Project ACT Collaborative Study Team
  1. 1.Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR)National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI)New YorkUSA
  2. 2.Housing Works, Inc.New YorkUSA
  3. 3.Columbia University School of Social WorkNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Independent consultantNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Division of Infectious DiseasesBeth Israel Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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