AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 914–920 | Cite as

HIV Infection Among Internally Displaced Women and Women Residing in River Populations Along the Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo

  • Andrea A. Kim
  • Faustin Malele
  • Reinhard Kaiser
  • Nicaise Mama
  • Timothée Kinkela
  • Jean-Caurent Mantshumba
  • Michelle Hynes
  • Stacy De Jesus
  • Godefoid Musema
  • Patrick K. Kayembe
  • Karen Hawkins Reed
  • Theresa Diaz
Original Paper

Abstract

We conducted a reproductive health assessment among women aged 15–49 years residing in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp and surrounding river populations in the Democratic Republic of Congo. After providing informed consent, participants were administered a behavioral questionnaire on demographics, sexual risk, reproductive health behavior, and a history of gender based violence. Participants provided a blood specimen for HIV and syphilis testing and were referred to HIV counseling and testing services established for this study to learn their HIV status. HIV prevalence was significantly higher among women in the IDP population compared to women in the river population. Sexually transmitted infection symptoms in the past 12 months and a history of sexual violence during the conflict were associated with HIV infection the river and IDP population, respectively. Targeted prevention, care, and treatment services are urgently needed for the IDP population and surrounding host communities during displacement and resettlement.

Keywords

HIV Sexually transmitted infections Displacement Conflict 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea A. Kim
    • 1
  • Faustin Malele
    • 2
  • Reinhard Kaiser
    • 3
  • Nicaise Mama
    • 4
  • Timothée Kinkela
    • 4
  • Jean-Caurent Mantshumba
    • 4
  • Michelle Hynes
    • 5
  • Stacy De Jesus
    • 5
  • Godefoid Musema
    • 6
  • Patrick K. Kayembe
    • 6
  • Karen Hawkins Reed
    • 2
  • Theresa Diaz
    • 1
  1. 1.Global AIDS Program, National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB PreventionUS Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Global AIDS Program Democratic Republic of CongoUS Centers for Disease Control and PreventionKinshasaDemocratic Republic of Congo
  3. 3.International Emergency and Refugee Health Branch, Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury PreventionUS Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Ministry of HealthKinshasaDemocratic Republic of Congo
  5. 5.Division of Reproductive Health, Coordinating Center for Health PromotionUS Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  6. 6.Kinshasa School of Public HealthKinshasaDemocratic Republic of Congo

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