AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 638–644 | Cite as

Increases in Unprotected Anal Intercourse with Serodiscordant Casual Partners Among HIV-Negative Gay Men in Sydney

  • Iryna B. Zablotska
  • June Crawford
  • John Imrie
  • Garrett Prestage
  • Fengyi Jin
  • Andrew Grulich
  • Susan Kippax
Article

Abstract

Prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse between casual male partners (UAIC) has been increasing worldwide. We explored trends in serodiscordant UAIC and the associated factors among gay men in Sydney. Proportions of HIV-positive and negative men with serodiscordant casual partners increased during 2003–2006. Prevalence of serodiscordant UAIC increased among HIV-negative men. Age, number of partners, seeking partners online, drug use and esoteric practices were associated with serodiscordant UAIC. Increases in serodiscordant UAIC may be related to growing disclosure. These findings do not indicate a core group of high-risk men. More research is needed about the context in which serodiscordant UAIC happens.

Keywords

HIV Serodiscordant Homosexually active men HIV disclosure Risk behaviour 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the key community partners—the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations (AFAO), the National Association of People Living with HIV/AIDS (NAPWA), the AIDS Council of New South Wales (ACON) and People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA, NSW) for being instrumental in the establishment of the PH and HIM studies. Many thanks go to all study participants for sharing their life experiences with the research team. We are also grateful for the financial support which made this study possible.

Funding

The National Centre in HIV Social Research and the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research are funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. The Health in Men Cohort study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (NIH/NIAID/DAIDS: HVDDT Award N01-AI-05395), the National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia (Project grant # 400944), the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (Canberra), and the New South Wales Health Department (Sydney). The Positive Health cohort study has been funded by the New South Wales Health Department (Sydney).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iryna B. Zablotska
    • 1
  • June Crawford
    • 1
  • John Imrie
    • 1
  • Garrett Prestage
    • 2
  • Fengyi Jin
    • 2
  • Andrew Grulich
    • 2
  • Susan Kippax
    • 1
  1. 1.National Centre in HIV Social ResearchUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical ResearchUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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