AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 932–941

High HIV Prevalence, Suboptimal HIV Testing, and Low Knowledge of HIV-Positive Serostatus Among Injection Drug Users in St. Petersburg, Russia

  • Linda M. Niccolai
  • Olga V. Toussova
  • Sergei V. Verevochkin
  • Russell Barbour
  • Robert Heimer
  • Andrei P. Kozlov
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this analysis was to estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence and testing patterns among injection drug users (IDUs) in St. Petersburg, Russia. HIV prevalence among 387 IDUs in the sample was 50%. Correlates of HIV-positive serostatus included unemployment, recent unsafe injections, and history/current sexually transmitted infection. Seventy-six percent had been HIV tested, but only 22% of those who did not report HIV-positive serostatus had been tested in the past 12 months and received their test result. Correlates of this measure included recent doctor visit and having been in prison or jail among men. Among the 193 HIV-infected participants, 36% were aware of their HIV-positive serostatus. HIV prevalence is high and continuing to increase in this population. Adequate coverage of HIV testing has not been achieved, resulting in poor knowledge of positive serostatus. Efforts are needed to better understand motivating and deterring factors for HIV testing in this setting.

Keywords

Russia Injection drug users HIV prevalence HIV testing HIV serostatus Knowledge 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Niccolai
    • 1
  • Olga V. Toussova
    • 2
  • Sergei V. Verevochkin
    • 2
  • Russell Barbour
    • 1
  • Robert Heimer
    • 1
  • Andrei P. Kozlov
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDSYale School of Public HealthNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.The Biomedical CenterSt. PetersburgRussia

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