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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 303–309 | Cite as

Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Zagreb, Croatia

  • Ivana Bozicevic
  • Oktavija Dakovic Rode
  • Snjezana Zidovec Lepej
  • Lisa Grazina Johnston
  • Aleksandar Stulhofer
  • Zoran Dominkovic
  • Valerio Bacak
  • Davorka Lukas
  • Josip Begovac
Report

Abstract

We used respondent-driven sampling among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Zagreb, Croatia in 2006 to investigate the prevalence of HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and sexual behaviours. We recruited 360 MSM. HIV infection was diagnosed in 4.5%. The seroprevalence of antibodies to viral pathogens was: herpes simplex virus type-2, 9.4%; hepatitis A, 14.2%; hepatitis C, 3.0%. Eighty percent of participants were susceptible to HBV infection (HBs antigen negative, and no antibodies to HBs and HBc antigen). Syphilis seroprevalence was 10.6%. Prevalence of Chlamydia and gonorrhoea was 9.0%, and 13.2%, respectively. Results indicate the need for interventions to diagnose, treat and prevent sexually transmitted infections among this population.

Keywords

HIV STI Men who have sex with men Respondent-driven sampling Sexual behaviours 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge with gratitude staff who worked on data collection, NGOs Iskorak and Croatian Association for HIV and individuals who participated in the study. The study was funded by the Croatian Ministry of Health through funds of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; and the UNDP Office in Croatia.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivana Bozicevic
    • 1
  • Oktavija Dakovic Rode
    • 2
  • Snjezana Zidovec Lepej
    • 2
  • Lisa Grazina Johnston
    • 3
  • Aleksandar Stulhofer
    • 4
  • Zoran Dominkovic
    • 5
  • Valerio Bacak
    • 4
  • Davorka Lukas
    • 2
  • Josip Begovac
    • 2
  1. 1.Andrija Stampar School of Public HealthZagrebCroatia
  2. 2.University Hospital for Infectious Diseases “Dr Fran Mihaljevic”ZagrebCroatia
  3. 3.Department of International Health & Development, Center for Global Health EquityTulane University School of Public Health & Tropical MedicineNew OrleansUSA
  4. 4.Faculty of Humanities and Social SciencesZagrebCroatia
  5. 5.Non-governmental OrganizationZagrebCroatia

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