AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 885–890

Needle and Syringe Sharing Practices Among Injecting Drug Users in Tehran: A Comparison of Two Neighborhoods, One with and One Without a Needle and Syringe Program

  • Saman Zamani
  • Mohsen Vazirian
  • Bijan Nassirimanesh
  • Emran Mohammad Razzaghi
  • Masako Ono-Kihara
  • Shahrzad Mortazavi Ravari
  • Mohammad Mehdi Gouya
  • Masahiro Kihara
Original Paper

Abstract

This study was conducted to compare needle and syringe sharing practices among injecting drug users (IDUs) in two neighborhoods, one with and one without a needle and syringe program (NSP). In 2005, 419 street-based IDUs were interviewed at specific locations in two neighborhoods where IDUs are known to congregate. We compared self-reported needle and syringe access and use between IDUs from a neighborhood with an active NSP to IDUs from a neighborhood without such an intervention. A significantly smaller proportion of IDUs from the former neighborhood reported having used a shared needle/syringe over a 1-month period (21.0%) compared to IDUs from the latter neighborhood (39.9%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.45). These findings indicate that access to an NSP may reduce needle and syringe sharing practices. Therefore, these programs should be intensified in settings with concentrated HIV epidemics among IDUs in Iran.

Keywords

Substance abuse, intravenous Needle-exchange programs HIV Iran 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saman Zamani
    • 1
  • Mohsen Vazirian
    • 2
  • Bijan Nassirimanesh
    • 3
  • Emran Mohammad Razzaghi
    • 2
  • Masako Ono-Kihara
    • 1
  • Shahrzad Mortazavi Ravari
    • 1
  • Mohammad Mehdi Gouya
    • 4
  • Masahiro Kihara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Global Health and Socio-EpidemiologyKyoto University School of Public HealthKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Iranian National Center for Addiction StudiesTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  3. 3.Persepolis SocietyTehranIran
  4. 4.Center for Disease ManagementMinistry of Health and Medical EducationTehranIran

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