AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 746–756

HIV Risk and the Internet: Results of the Men’s INTernet Sex (MINTS) Study

  • B. R. Simon Rosser
  • Michael H. Miner
  • Walter O. Bockting
  • Michael W. Ross
  • Joseph Konstan
  • Laura Gurak
  • Jeffrey Stanton
  • Weston Edwards
  • Scott Jacoby
  • Alex Carballo-Diéguez
  • Rafael Mazin
  • Eli Coleman
Original Paper

Abstract

This study assessed the feasibility of online recruitment of high-risk Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) for HIV prevention survey research and investigated the relationship between Internet use and unsafe sex. Participants (= 1,026) were Internet-using Latino MSM living in the U.S. recruited using online banner advertisements. Respondents completed a cross-sectional, online survey in English or Spanish. Sample characteristics reflected national statistics within 5%. Nearly all (99%) reported having used the Internet to seek sex with another man. Two-thirds of respondents reported having unprotected anal sex with ≥1 man in the last year, 57% of these with multiple partners. Participants reported engaging in anal sex and unprotected anal sex with nearly twice as many men first met online versus offline, but risk proportions did not differ. Internet-based HIV prevention research is possible even with geographically-dispersed minority populations. Efficiency appears the primary risk associated with meeting partners online.

Keywords

HIV prevention Internet sex Latino Men who have sex with men Men who use the Internet to seek sex with men MISM 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Simon Rosser
    • 1
  • Michael H. Miner
    • 2
  • Walter O. Bockting
    • 2
  • Michael W. Ross
    • 3
  • Joseph Konstan
    • 4
  • Laura Gurak
    • 5
  • Jeffrey Stanton
    • 2
  • Weston Edwards
    • 2
  • Scott Jacoby
    • 2
  • Alex Carballo-Diéguez
    • 6
  • Rafael Mazin
    • 7
  • Eli Coleman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology & Community Health, Center for HIV/STI Intervention and Prevention StudiesUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Medicine & Community Health, Center for HIV/STI Intervention and Prevention StudiesUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.Center for Health Promotion & Prevention ResearchUniversity of Texas School of Public HealthHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Computer Science & EngineeringUniversity of Minnesota Institute of TechnologyMinneapolisUSA
  5. 5.Department of RhetoricUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  6. 6.HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral SciencesColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization for the AmericasWashingtonUSA

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