AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 431–440

Consistent Condom Use in South African Youth’s Most Recent Sexual Relationships

  • Witness Moyo
  • Brooke A. Levandowski
  • Catherine MacPhail
  • Helen Rees
  • Audrey Pettifor
Original Paper

Abstract

Sexually active South African youth are at high risk for HIV infection but a low prevalence of condom use has been reported in this population. We examined correlates of consistent condom use with most recent sex partners among a nationally representative sample of youth 15–24 years old who reported having had sex in the previous 12 months (N = 6,649). Among men and women, having talked to a partner about using condoms was the most significant predictor of consistent condom use. However, youth who reported being in their most recent relationship for more than 1 year and who reported having had sex one or more times in the last month were more likely to report inconsistent condom use. HIV interventions should empower youth to talk about using condoms with their partners, encourage periodic testing for HIV, and reinforce condom use according to HIV status in long-term relationships.

Keywords

Condoms HIV Youth South Africa Communication 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Witness Moyo
    • 1
  • Brooke A. Levandowski
    • 2
  • Catherine MacPhail
    • 1
  • Helen Rees
    • 1
  • Audrey Pettifor
    • 2
  1. 1.Reproductive Health & HIV Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chris Hani Baragwanath HospitalUniversity of WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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