AIDS and Behavior

, 11:58 | Cite as

Supporting Positive Living and Sexual Health (SPLASH): A Clinician and Behavioral Counselor Risk-Reduction Intervention in a University-Based HIV Clinic

  • María Luisa Zúñiga
  • Heather Baldwin
  • Daniel Uhler
  • Jesse Brennan
  • Alisa María Olshefsky
  • Erin Oliver
  • William Christopher Mathews
Original Paper

Abstract

Effective HIV prevention interventions with HIV-positive persons are paramount to stemming the rate of new infections. This paper describes an HIV-clinic-based demonstration project aimed at decreasing patient HIV-transmission risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections. Systematic, computer-assisted assessment of patient risk aided primary care providers in delivering prevention messages. Patients at greater risk were referred to an HIV Prevention Specialist for behavioral counseling. Patients completed a computerized behavioral staging assessment to self-identify risk behaviors and readiness to change behaviors and counseling messages were individually tailored based on computer assessment. Challenges to project implementation: primary care provider buy-in, patient privacy concerns during risk assessment, and low participation in behavioral counseling. Forty-six percent of persons completing a risk assessment (2,124) were at risk for HIV transmission. Of 121 patients who scheduled counseling appointments, 42% completed at least one session. Despite challenges, successful implementation of a clinic-based prevention intervention is feasible, particularly with attention to patient and provider concerns.

Keywords

HIV prevention Clinical intervention Risk assessment Risk behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • María Luisa Zúñiga
    • 1
  • Heather Baldwin
    • 2
  • Daniel Uhler
    • 2
  • Jesse Brennan
    • 3
  • Alisa María Olshefsky
    • 4
  • Erin Oliver
    • 1
  • William Christopher Mathews
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  4. 4.Delaware Division of Public Health, Health Promotion and Disease PreventionDoverUSA

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