AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 369–376 | Cite as

The Babel Effect: Community Linguistic Diversity and Extramarital Sex in Uganda

  • David Bishai
  • Priya Patil
  • George Pariyo
  • Ken Hill
Article

We examine the association of community linguistic diversity with non-spousal sexual activity in Uganda. We conducted a survey on rates of sexual contact in last 12 months among 1709 respondents age 18–60 living in Uganda in early 2001. Households were selected at random from Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) 2000 household sampling frame listings in 12 districts and 120 clusters. Household listings described the principal language spoken by every household in the cluster. Sexual contact was reported by 26 vs. 13% of unmarried women in multilingual vs. monolingual clusters respectively. Extramarital sexual contact occurred for 29 vs. 16% for married men in multilingual vs. monolingual clusters respectively. These results were robust to multivariate models which included confounders such as urbanity, and cluster distance to market places, cinemas, and transportation. Our results suggest a robust association between residence in a multilinguistic community and higher rates of non-spousal sex.

KEY WORDS:

Uganda community extramarital sex 

REFERENCES

  1. Basu, A. M. (1998). Poverty and AIDS: The vicious circle. In M. Livi-Bacci and G. De Santis (Eds.), Population and poverty in the developing world (pp. 145–160). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bishai, D., Pariyo, G., Ainsworth, M., and Hill, K. (2004). Determinants of personal demand for an AIDS vaccine in Uganda. Bulletin of The World Health Organization, 82, 652–660.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Cutler, D. M., Elmendorf, D., and Zeckhauser, R. (1993). Demographic characteristics and the public bundle. Public Finance, 48, 178–198.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Easterly, W., and Levine, R. (1997). Africa’s growth tragedy: Policies and ethnic divisions. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112(4), 1203–1250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fang, J., Madhavan, S., Bosworth, W., and Alderman, M. H. (1998). Residential segregation and mortality in New York City. Social Science and Medicine, 47(4), 469–476.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Faris, R. E., and Dunham, H. W. (1939). Mental disorders in urban areas. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Francoeur, R. T., Perper, T., Scherzer, N. A., Sellmer, G., and Cornog, M. (1991). A descriptive dictionary and atlas of sexology. (p. 130). New York: Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
  8. Franzini, L., and Spears, W. (2003). Contributions of social context to inequalities in years of life lost to heart disease in Texas, USA. Social Science and Medicine, 57, 1847–1861.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Franzoni, l., and Spears, W. (2003). Contributions of social context to inequalities in years of life lost to heart disease in Texas, USA. Social Science and Medicine, 57, 1847–1861.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Green, E. (2003). Testimony of Edward C. Green Before African Subcommittee U.S. Senate. Washington, DC: U.S. Senate.Google Scholar
  11. Guilamo-Ramos, V., Jaccard, J., Pena, J., and Goldberg, V. (2005). Acculturation-related variables, sexual initiation, and subsequent sexual behavior among Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Cuban youth. Health Psychology, 24(1), 88–95.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Halpern, D., and Nazroo, J. (2000). The ethnic density effect: results from a national community survey of England and Wales. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 46(1), 34–46.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Heuveline, P. (2004). The Structure of an Epidemic: A Model of AIDS Transmission in Sub Saharan Africa. Paper presented at the Population Association of America, Boston, MA.Google Scholar
  14. Hogle, J. (2002). What Happened in Uganda? Declining HIV Prevalence, Behavior Change, and the National Response. Washington, DC: U.S. Agency for International Development.Google Scholar
  15. La Ferrara, E. (2003). Kin Groups and Reciprocity: A Model of Credit Transactions in Ghana. American Economic Review, 93, 1730–1751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Montgomery, M., and Casterline, J. (1996). Social learning, social influence, and new models of fertility. Population and Development Review, 22(Suppl), 151–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Patil, P. (2003). Community Contextual and Environmental Determinants of HIV Risk in Rakai District, Uganda. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University.Google Scholar
  18. Porter, L., Hao, L., Bishai, D., and Gray, R. (2004). HIV Status and Union Dissolution in Rakai, Uganda. Demography, 41(3), 465–482.Google Scholar
  19. Poterba, J. (1997). Demographic Structure and the Political Economy of Public Education. Journal of Public Policy and Management, 16, 48–66.Google Scholar
  20. Vandello, J. A., and Cohen, D. (2003). Male honor and female fidelity: implicit cultural scripts that perpetuate domestic violence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 997–1010.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Wilson, J., Kuehn, R., and Beach, F. (1963). Modifications in the Sexual Behavior of Male Rats Produced by Changing the Stimulus Female. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 56, 636–644.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Bishai
    • 1
    • 4
  • Priya Patil
    • 2
  • George Pariyo
    • 3
  • Ken Hill
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Population and Family Health SciencesJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Futures GroupWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Makerere UniversityKampalaUganda
  4. 4.Department of Population and Family Health SciencesJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

Personalised recommendations