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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 707–715 | Cite as

Gender differences in sexual behaviors, sexual partnerships, and HIV among drug users in New York City

  • Judith AbsalonEmail author
  • Crystal M. Fuller
  • Danielle C. Ompad
  • Shannon Blaney
  • Beryl Koblin
  • Sandro Galea
  • David Vlahov
Original Paper

Abstract

We compared sexual behaviors/partnerships and determined sexual risk correlates associated with HIV by gender among street-recruited drug users using chi-square tests and logistic regression. Men reported higher risk sexual behaviors, yet fewer high-risk sexual partners than women. After adjustment, HIV seropositive men were more likely than seronegatives to be older, MSM, use condoms, and have an HIV-infected partner. HIV seropositive women were more likely to be older, have an HIV-infected partner, and not use non-injected heroin. IDU was not associated with HIV. Prospective studies are needed to determine how gender-specific sexual behaviors/partnerships among drug users affect HIV acquisition.

Key Words

Drug users Sexual behaviors Partnerships HIV Gender 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the study participants and the New York Academy of Medicine storefront and mobile unit staff. This study was funded by National Institute on Drug Abuse: DA 13146 and DA 12801.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Absalon
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Crystal M. Fuller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Danielle C. Ompad
    • 2
  • Shannon Blaney
    • 2
  • Beryl Koblin
    • 3
  • Sandro Galea
    • 2
  • David Vlahov
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Infectious Disease Epidemiologic Research (CIDER), Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies (CUES)New York Academy of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Infectious Disease PreventionThe New York Blood CenterNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of EpidemiologyMailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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