AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 325–331

Number of Risk Acts by Relationship Status and Partner Serostatus: Findings from the HIM Cohort of Homosexually Active Men in Sydney, Australia

  • June M. Crawford
  • Susan C. Kippax
  • Limin Mao
  • Paul G. Van de Ven
  • Garrett P. Prestage
  • Andrew E. Grulich
  • John Kaldor
Original Paper

In recent years, increases in both risk behavior and in seroconversion among homosexually active men have been noted in a number of parts of the world. Data were available from 903 HIV negative homosexual men regarding number of acts of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), separated into receptive and insertive UAI, with and without ejaculation, with steady and with casual partners. Partners were classified according to serostatus as reported by respondents. Men (N = 325) reported 13,692 UAI acts, most of which were with steady partners, of whom most were reported to be HIV-negative. With HIV-positive partners, both steady and casual, and with casual partners of unknown serostatus, receptive UAI with ejaculation was relatively rare. Insertive UAI without ejaculation was relatively common with casual partners of unknown serostatus. Patterns of UAI suggest that risk of transmission may be greater with steady partners. Men appear to modify practice according to both the nature of the relationship (steady or casual) and (assumed) serostatus of partner.

KEY WORDS:

HIV risk behavior behavioral surveillance homosexually active men 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • June M. Crawford
    • 1
    • 3
  • Susan C. Kippax
    • 1
  • Limin Mao
    • 1
  • Paul G. Van de Ven
    • 1
  • Garrett P. Prestage
    • 2
  • Andrew E. Grulich
    • 2
  • John Kaldor
    • 2
  1. 1.National Centre in HIV Social ResearchUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.National Centre in Epidemiology and Clinical ResearchUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.National Centre in HIV Social ResearchUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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