AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 279–286 | Cite as

Substance Abuse and Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Women with Histories of Child Sexual Abuse

  • Honghu Liu
  • Doug Longshore
  • John K. Williams
  • Inna Rivkin
  • Tamra Loeb
  • Umme S. Warda
  • Jennifer Carmona
  • Gail Wyatt
HIV Treatment Research Article

Abstract

Substance abuse increases the risks for infections and impairs medication adherence among HIV/AIDS patients. However, little is known about the characteristics of substance abuse and its impact on medication adherence among HIV-positive women with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA). In the present study, 148 HIV-positive women with a history of CSA completed a structured interview assessing CSA severity, psychological status, substance abuse, medication adherence, and sexual decision-making. Severity of CSA was significantly associated with substance use but not with adherence. Participants who had used hard drugs and who had lower self-esteem and adherence self-efficacy reported significantly lower levels of adherence. Additional research on how CSA experiences impact health behaviors is needed to help develop culturally congruent interventions to reduce risk behaviors and facilitate better medication adherence for this vulnerable population.

KEY WORDS

substance abuse medication adherence depression anxiety HIV/AIDS child sexual abuse. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Honghu Liu
    • 1
    • 4
  • Doug Longshore
    • 2
  • John K. Williams
    • 3
  • Inna Rivkin
    • 3
  • Tamra Loeb
    • 3
  • Umme S. Warda
    • 3
  • Jennifer Carmona
    • 3
  • Gail Wyatt
    • 3
  1. 1.UCLA Department of MedicineDivision of General Internal Medicine and Health Services ResearchLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesIntegrated Substance Abuse ProgramLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesSexual Health ProgramLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services ResearchUCLA Department of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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