AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 459–464

Psychosocial Impact of Repeat HIV-Negative Testing: A Follow-Up Study

  • Karen Ryder
  • Dennis J. Haubrich
  • Domenico Callà
  • Ted Myers
  • Ann N. Burchell
  • Liviana Calzavara
HIV Testing and Counseling

Continued sexual risk behavior following repeatedly testing HIV-negative in the Polaris HIV Seroconversion Study (Ontario, Canada) led to this follow-up study which identifies the impact of repeat negative testing among 64 men and women. Repeat HIV-negative testing frequently results in confusion as to what constitutes risk and occasionally to thoughts of HIV immunity. Narrative accounts include beliefs that monogamy constitutes safety from HIV, that psychosocial factors other than repeatedly testing negative leads to risk, and that sexual risk reduction is unsustainable. In conclusion, the repeat negative test experience for some neither clarifies risk behavior nor reinforces sustained risk reduction.

KEY WORDS:

repeat HIV-negative testing psychosocial impact men who have sex with men heterosexuals 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Ryder
    • 1
    • 4
  • Dennis J. Haubrich
    • 2
  • Domenico Callà
    • 1
  • Ted Myers
    • 1
  • Ann N. Burchell
    • 1
  • Liviana Calzavara
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.School of Social Work, Faculty of Community ServicesRyerson UniversityTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Polaris HIV Seroconversion Study, Department of Public Health ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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