AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 513–523

Psychosocial, Behavioral, and Cultural Predictors of Sexual Risk for HIV Infection Among Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men

  • S. Lisbeth Jarama
  • J. David Kennamer
  • Paul J. Poppen
  • Michael Hendricks
  • Judith Bradford
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-005-9022-1

Cite this article as:
Jarama, S.L., Kennamer, J.D., Poppen, P.J. et al. AIDS Behav (2005) 9: 513. doi:10.1007/s10461-005-9022-1

This study sought to replicate and extend an investigation by Diaz et al. (1999) on determinants of HIV risk among Latino gay and bisexual men living in San Francisco who were predominantly English-speaking. Compared to the Diaz et al. study, the current study sample consisted of predominantly Spanish-speaking MSM, who resided outside of HIV/AIDS epicenters and whose countries of origin were primarily Central & South American. The relationships of unprotected anal sex and multiple sexual partners with demographic, developmental, behavioral, cultural and psychosocial variables were examined. Data were collected in a convenience sample of 250 participants (primarily immigrants from El Salvador) residing in Virginia. Most men in the sample had more than one sexual partner in the last 3 months (62%) and more than a third had unprotected anal sex with a casual partner in the same time period. Communication about HIV, sexual attraction, machismo, and experiences of discrimination based on homosexual behavior were predictive of HIV risk behaviors. The findings support an integrative approach to investigating HIV risk among Latino MSM. Implications for prevention programs are discussed.

KEY WORDS:

HIV risk Latino MSM culture 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Lisbeth Jarama
    • 1
  • J. David Kennamer
    • 2
  • Paul J. Poppen
    • 1
    • 4
  • Michael Hendricks
    • 3
  • Judith Bradford
    • 2
  1. 1.George Washington UniversityWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Virginia Commonwealth UniversityWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Washington Psychological CenterWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyGeorge Washington UniversityWashingtonUSA

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