AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 485–493 | Cite as

Traditional Healers for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Family Planning, Kiboga District, Uganda: Evaluation of a Program to Improve Practices

  • Agnes Ssali
  • Lisa M. Butler
  • Donna Kabatesi
  • Rachel King
  • Agnes Namugenyi
  • Moses R. Kamya
  • Jeffrey Mandel
  • Sanny Y. Chen
  • Willi McFarland
Other Research Articles

In the face of ongoing epidemics of HIV/AIDS and STI, high demand for family planning, and limited resources, traditional healers may be under-utilized providers of reproductive health education in rural sub-Saharan Africa. We implemented a training program in HIV prevention and family planning methods for healers in the Kiboga district of Uganda and evaluated the program's impact on healers' clinical practice and the diffusion of information to their female clients. Of 46 healers recruited, 30 (65%) completed a pre- and post- training interview. Following training, traditional healers increased discussions of family planning with their clients. Of 84 female clients recruited, 44 (52%) completed the interview before and after the training for healers. Female clients corroborated that they increased discussions of family planning with their healers, as well as discussions about HIV/AIDS. Both healers and their female clients were more likely to make a connection between family planning, condom use, and HIV prevention after the training compared to before the training. Findings provide evidence that traditional healers in a rural area of Uganda can successfully adapt HIV prevention messages and family planning information into their clinical practices.

KEY WORDS:

traditional healers uganda HIV prevention family planning 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the traditional healers and their female clients who contributed to this study. We appreciate the trainers who gave their time to conduct the intervention, and the interviewers who worked tirelessly to collect the data. Finally, we are grateful to the traditional healers association and the district medical office whose collaboration made this study possible.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agnes Ssali
    • 1
  • Lisa M. Butler
    • 2
  • Donna Kabatesi
    • 1
  • Rachel King
    • 1
  • Agnes Namugenyi
    • 3
  • Moses R. Kamya
    • 4
  • Jeffrey Mandel
    • 2
  • Sanny Y. Chen
    • 5
  • Willi McFarland
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Traditional and Modern Health Practitioners Together Against AIDS (THETA)KampalaUganda
  2. 2.Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, Department of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.District Health TeamKiboga DistrictUganda
  4. 4.Department of MedicineMakerere UniversityKampalaUganda
  5. 5.San  Francisco Department  of  Public  HealthSan  FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.San Francisco Department of Public HealthSan FranciscoUSA

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