Agriculture and Human Values

, Volume 26, Issue 1–2, pp 3–14

2008 AFHVS presidential address

The four questions in agrifood studies: a view from the bus
Article

Abstract

The critical studies in the Sociology of Agriculture can be generally divided into four questions: Agrarian, Environmental, Food, and Emancipatory. While the four questions overlap and all address social justice concerns, there is a chronological sequence to the studies. In this presidential address presented at the joint meetings of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society and the Association for the Study of Food in Society held in June 2008 in New Orleans, LA, I provide an overview of the four questions and call for researchers and activists in agrifood studies to engage as public social scientists to bring about a more just and equitable agrifood system.

Keywords

Agrarian Agrifood Emancipatory Environmental Food Value chain 

Abbreviations

AFHVS

Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society

ANT

Actor network theory

ASFS

Association for the Study of Food in Society

CAFO

Confined animal feeding operation

CSA

Community supported agriculture

FDI

Foreign direct investment

IMF

International Monetary Fund

NAC

New agricultural country

NAFTA

North American Free Trade Agreement

NIC

Newly industrialized country

TNC

Transnational corporation

TOFGA

Texas Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association

WTO

World Trade Organization

USDA/LISA

United States Department of Agriculture Low Input Sustainable Agriculture

USDA/SARE

United States Department of Agriculture Sustainable Agriculture Research Education

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologySam Houston State UniversityHuntsvilleUSA

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