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A collaborative agent-based traffic signal system for highly dynamic traffic conditions

  • Behnam Torabi
  • Rym Z. WenksternEmail author
  • Robert Saylor
Article
  • 28 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Agents and Multiagent Systems for Social Good

Abstract

In this paper we present DALI, a distributed, collaborative multi-agent traffic signal timing system (TST) for highly dynamic traffic conditions. In DALI, intersection controllers are augmented with software agents which collaboratively adapt signal timings by considering the feedback of all controller agents that may be affected by a change. The model is based on a real-world TST and will be deployed with minimal changes to the infrastructure. DALI has been validated by traffic engineers as well as through extensive simulation of the City of Richardson’s traffic network, comprising 128 signalized intersections. The experimental results show that, in highly dynamic scenarios, DALI outperforms the conventional traffic system used by the city as well as a state-of-the-art reinforcement learning-based TST.

Keywords

Intelligent transportation system Multi-agent systems Coordinated decision making 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Texas at DallasRichardsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Transportation and MobilityCity of RichardsonUSA

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