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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 86, Issue 1, pp 49–60 | Cite as

Effect of root competition and shade on survival and growth of nine woody plant taxa within a pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] alley cropping system

  • Edward H. FletcherIII
  • Mack ThetfordEmail author
  • Jyotsna Sharma
  • Shibu Jose
Article

Abstract

Suitability for production of woody floral stems in a pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] alley cropping was determined for nine shrub species in northwest Florida. Treatments included partial shade without root competition, partial shade with root competition, and full sun. Only three species had high rates of survival for all treatments throughout both years of the study: Callicarpa americana L. (American beautyberry), C. americana var. Lactea (white American beautyberry), and Crataegus marshallii Eggl. (parsley haw). For C. americana, plant growth index increased through time and was similar among the three treatments, indicating that this species grew equally well in sun or shade irrespective of root competition from the tree crop. C. americana var. Lactea had similarly high rates of survival and grew largest in partial shade without root competition (81.7 cm) compared to partial shade with root competition (67.2 cm) and full sun (57.0 cm). C. marshallii had 100 % survival in partial shade without root competition, with one mortality in partial shade with root competition (91.7 % survival) and one in full sun (91.7 % survival). Growth index did not increase over time and was similar among all three treatments. Other species tested had low rates of survival in all treatments throughout both years of the study and included: Ilex glabra L. (inkberry), Ilex myrtifolia Walt. (myrtle-leaf holly), Hydrangea paniculata Seibold var. ‘Tardiva’ (panicle hydrangea), Hydrangea quercifolia Bart. (oakleaf hydrangea), Lyonia lucida (Lam.) K. Koch, and Salix matsudana Koidz. F. tortuosa Rehd. (corkscrew willow). No species produced sufficient flowers, fruits or ornamental stems during this establishment period to allow a florist evaluation of the stems for use as woody floral stems.

Keywords

Woody floral stems Agroforestry Tree-Crop interactions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward H. FletcherIII
    • 1
  • Mack Thetford
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jyotsna Sharma
    • 2
  • Shibu Jose
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Environmental HorticultureUniversity of Florida WFRECMiltonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Environmental HorticultureUniversity of Florida NFRECQuincyUSA
  3. 3.The Center for Agroforestry, School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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