Aerobiologia

, 24:99

Keratinophilic fungi inhabiting floor dusts of student houses at the South Valley University in Egypt

  • Thanaa A. Maghraby
  • Youssuf A. M. H. Gherbawy
  • Mohamed A. Hussein
Original Paper

Abstract

Keratinophilic fungi include true fungi that vigorously degrade keratin as well as a number of important human pathogenic dermatophytes. We identified 41 species and one variety belonging to 19 genera in 50 floor dust samples following culture on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar medium at 28°C. Dermatophytes and closely related fungi were represented by six species—Aphanoascus fulvescens, Aphanoascus sp., Arthroderma cuniculi, Chrysosporium lucknowense, Gymnoascus uncinatus and Trichophyton rubrum. There were 35 species and one variety of other fungal species, with members of Aspergillus and Penicllium being the most prevalent. Twenty-seven species and 1 variety belonging to 14 genera were identified from 24 dust samples gathered at 2-week intervals from male student housing at El-Kenose during January–December 2005 that had been cultured on Sabauraud’s dextrose agar at 28°C. The monthly counts of keratinophilic fungi showed irregular fluctuations, with a peak in April and the lowest point in November. Dermatophytes and closely related fungi were represented by Aphanoascus fulvescens, Aphanoascus sp., Chrysosporium lucknowense, Gymnoascus uncinatus, and Trichophyton rubrum. In conclusion, the study reports the incidences of some dermatophytes found in the floor dust of student houses of South Valley University, Egypt.

Keywords

Aphanoascus Chrysosporium Dermatophytes Floor dust Keratinophilic fungi 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thanaa A. Maghraby
    • 1
  • Youssuf A. M. H. Gherbawy
    • 2
  • Mohamed A. Hussein
    • 1
  1. 1.Botany Department, Faculty of ScienceSouth Valley UniversityQenaEgypt
  2. 2.Biological Sciences Department, Faculty of ScienceTaif UniversityTaifKingdom of Saudi Arabia

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