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Adsorption

, Volume 20, Issue 2–3, pp 511–524 | Cite as

Design of a H2 PSA for cogeneration of ultrapure hydrogen and power at an advanced integrated gasification combined cycle with pre-combustion capture

  • Mauro Luberti
  • Daniel Friedrich
  • Stefano Brandani
  • Hyungwoong AhnEmail author
Article

Abstract

A novel hydrogen pressure swing adsorption system has been studied that is applied to an advanced integrated gasification combined cycle plant for cogenerating power and ultrapure hydrogen (99.99+ mol%) with CO2 capture. In designing the H2 PSA, it is essential to increase the recovery of ultrapure hydrogen product to its maximum since the power consumption for compressing the H2 PSA tail gas up to the gas turbine operating pressure should be minimised to save the total auxiliary power consumption of the advanced IGCC plant. In this study, it is sought to increase the H2 recovery by increasing the complexity of the PSA step configuration that enables a PSA cycle to have a lower feed flow to one column for adsorption and more pressure equalisation steps. As a result the H2 recovery reaches a maximum around 93 % with a Polybed H2 PSA system having twelve columns and the step configuration contains simultaneous adsorption at three columns and four-stage pressure equalisation.

Keywords

IGCC Pressure swing adsorption Hydrogen purification Cogeneration 

Nomenclature

Ac

Internal column surface area, m2

Ap

Pellet surface area, m2

bij

Adsorption equilibrium constant of site j for comp. i, bar−1

bi,0j

Pre-exponential adsorption equilibrium constant coefficient of site j for comp. i, bar−1

ci

Gas concentration of component i, mol m−3

cim

Gas concentration of component i in the macropore, mol m−3

cT

Total gas concentration, mol m−3

\(c_{P,s}\)

Specific heat capacity at constant pressure of the adsorbent, J kg−1 K−1

DL

Axial mass dispersion coefficient, m2s−1

Dc

Column diameter, m

Dm

Molecular diffusivity, m2 s−1

Dp,i

Macropore diffusivity of component i, m2 s−1

dp

Pellet averaged diameter, m

hw

Heat transfer coefficient at the column wall, W m−2 K−1

Hf

Enthalpy in the fluid phase per unit volume, J m−3

\(\widetilde{H}_{i}\)

Partial molar enthalpy in the fluid phase of component i, J mol−1

\(\varDelta \widetilde{H}_{i}^{j}\)

Heat of adsorption of site j for component i, J mol−1

Ji

Diffusive flux of component i, mol m−2 s−1

JT

Thermal diffusive flux, W m−2

kg

Gas conductivity, W m−1 K−1

kip·Ap/Vp

LDF mass transfer coefficient of component i in the pellet, s−1

kicr·3/rc

LDF mass transfer coefficient of component i in the crystal, s−1

Lc

Column length, m

Mads

Adsorbent mass, kg

P

Pressure, bar

Pr

Prandtl number, [-]

\(\bar{q}_{i}\)

Average adsorbed concentration of component i in the crystal, mol kg−1

qi*

Adsorbed concentration of component i at equilibrium, mol kg−1

qi,sj

Saturation capacity of site j for comp. i, mol kg−1

\(\bar{Q}_{i}\)

Average adsorbed concentration of component i in the pellet, mol m−3

Qfeed

Feed flow rate, mol s−1

R

Ideal gas constant J mol−1 K−1

Re

Reynolds number, [-]

rc

Crystal radius, m

rp

Pellet radius, m

Sc

Schimdt number, [-]

t

Time, s

tcycle

Cycle time, s

T

Temperature, K

Tf

Fluid temperature, K

Tw

Column wall temperature, K

u

Velocity, m s−1

Uf

Internal energy in the fluid phase per unit volume, J m−3

UP

Internal energy in the pellet per unit volume, J m−3

UP,f

Internal energy in the macropore per unit volume, J m−3

UP,s

Internal energy in the solid phase per unit volume, J m−3

v

Interstitial flow velocity, m s−1

Vc

Column volume, m3

Vp

Pellet volume, m3

xi, yi

Molar fraction of component i, [-]

z

Spatial dimension, m

Greek letters

ε

External bed void fraction, [-]

εp

Pellet void fraction, [-]

λL

Axial thermal dispersion coefficient, W m−1 K−1

μ

Viscosity, bar s

ρf

Fluid density, kg m−3

ρp

Pellet density, kg m−3

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to express our gratitude for the financial support from KETEP (Grant No.: 2011-8510020030) and EPSRC (Grant Nos.: EP/F034520/1, EP/G062129/1, and EP/J018198/1).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Luberti
    • 1
  • Daniel Friedrich
    • 1
  • Stefano Brandani
    • 1
  • Hyungwoong Ahn
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage Centre, Institute for Materials and Processes, School of EngineeringThe University of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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