Adsorption

, Volume 11, Issue 5–6, pp 519–527 | Cite as

Influence of Light Scattering by Residual Alumina Nanoparticles on the Analysis of Surfactants Adsorption Using Spectroscopy

Article

Abstract

The adsorption of a surfactant mixture, based on an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) and a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100, or TX100), on alumina nanoparticles was determined by solution depletion method combined with spectrometric measurement. It is shown that the light scattering, originated from the residual adsorbent alumina particles in the supernatant after centrifugation separation, interferes with the measurements of absorbance of the surfactant molecules, and therefore constitutes an error source for determination of the surfactant concentration in the supernatant by spectrometric means. The intensity of this light scattering, namely the influence of the residual alumina nanoparticles upon the surfactant adsorption, was related to the surfactant adsorption and its equilibrium concentration and varied among a batch. In this paper we report a Kalman filter method in order to eliminate the variational scattering background caused by non-separated residual alumina nanoparticles in each supernatant. This method is of interest as it is simple, easy to carry out and of high precision.

Keywords

adsorption light scattering surfactant mixture Kalman filter 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qi Kang
    • 1
  • Bao Yu Gao
    • 1
  • Jingtian Hu
    • 2
  • Dazhong Shen
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Environmental Science and EngineeringShandong UniversityJinanP.R. China
  2. 2.School of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringShandong UniversityJinanP.R. China

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