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Multicultural Competence: Exploring the Link between Globalization, Select Demographics, and School Counselors’ Self-Perceptions

  • Leon Rodgers
  • Charné Furcron
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Abstract

This study investigated the self-reported multicultural competence of school counselors employed within an urban, socioeconomically blended public school district in the Southern United States (U.S.). Participants completed two instruments: a demographic questionnaire and the Multicultural Counseling Competence and Training Survey-Revised (MCCTS-R; Holcomb-McCoy and Myers 1999). Results revealed that four of ten demographic variables demonstrated significance in relation to self-reported multicultural competence. Future research recommendations include, studying a larger population, incorporating qualitative elements, considering racial identity development in relation to self-reported multicultural competence, and comparing MCCTS-R self-report scores with independent observer ratings of demonstrated multicultural competencies in response to case vignettes or video recorded student-school counselor situations (e.g., individual or group counseling).

Keywords

School counselor Immigration Migration Racism Multicultural competence 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ColumbusUSA
  2. 2.AtlantaUSA

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