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Gifted Education and Counselling in Canada

  • Judy L. Lupart
  • Michael C. Pyryt
  • Shelley L. Watson
  • Krista Pierce
Article

Abstract

Education in Canada is determined at the provincial level of jurisdiction. Each province and territory has a unique system of legislation and policy, although most provinces view the education of gifted students as a category of service provision under special education. The first section of this paper provides a brief, general overview of key themes that emerge from an analysis of the relevant Education Ministry documents and literature concerning gifted education and counselling within the Canadian context. Where appropriate, the particular province(s) and/or territory(s) associated with the themes is noted. The second section highlights the work of Canadian scholars most relevant to counsellors working with gifted students. A brief review of recommended counselling needs, goals, and practices for the gifted is presented in the conclusion.

Key Words

Canadian education gifted education counselling needs gifted counselling counselling parents 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judy L. Lupart
    • 1
  • Michael C. Pyryt
    • 2
  • Shelley L. Watson
    • 1
  • Krista Pierce
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AlbartaAlbarta
  2. 2.University of CalgaryCalgary

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