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European Journal of Ageing

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 245–253 | Cite as

A new comprehensive and international view on ageing: introducing the ‘Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe’

  • Axel Börsch-Supan
  • Karsten Hank
  • Hendrik Jürges
Original Investigation

Abstract

This paper introduces the ‘Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe’ (SHARE) to researchers on ageing. SHARE provides an infrastructure to help researchers better understand the individual and population ageing process: where we are, where we are heading to, and how we can influence the quality of life as we age, both as individuals and as societies. The baseline wave in 2004 provides data on the life circumstances of some 27,000 persons aged 50 and over in 11 European countries, ranging from Scandinavia across Western and Central Europe to the Mediterranean. SHARE has made great efforts to deliver truly comparable data, so we can reliably study how differences in cultures, living conditions and policy approaches shape the life of Europeans just before and after retirement. The paper first describes the SHARE data. In order to demonstrate its value, it then presents highlights from the three main research areas covered by SHARE, namely economics, sociology, and health.

Keywords

Ageing Cross-national research Europe SHARE 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work in this paper has been supported financially through the fifth framework programme under the project name of AMANDA (“Advanced Multidisciplinary Analysis of New Data on Ageing”, QLK6-CT-2002-002426). The paper uses data from the early release 0 of SHARE 2004. This release is preliminary and may contain errors that will be corrected in later releases. The SHARE data collection has been primarily funded by the European Commission through the fifth framework programme (project QLK6-CT-2001-00360 in the thematic programme Quality of Life). Additional funding came from the US National Institute on Aging (U01 AG09740-13S2, P01 AG005842, P01 AG08291, P30 AG12815, Y1-AG-4553-01, and OGHA 04-064). Data collection in Austria (through the Austrian Science Fund, FWF), Belgium (through the Belgian Science Policy Office), and Switzerland (through BBW/OFES/UFES) were nationally funded.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Axel Börsch-Supan
    • 1
  • Karsten Hank
    • 1
  • Hendrik Jürges
    • 1
  1. 1.Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of AgingUniversity of MannheimMannheimGermany

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