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Acta Mechanica Sinica

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 531–541 | Cite as

The effects of corrugation and wing planform on the aerodynamic force production of sweeping model insect wings

  • Guoyu Luo
  • Mao Sun
Article

Abstract

The effects of corrugation and wing planform (shape and aspect ratio) on the aerodynamic force production of model insect wings in sweeping (rotating after an initial start) motion at Reynolds number 200 and 3500 at angle of attack 40° are investigated, using the method of computational fluid dynamics. A representative wing corrugation is considered. Wing-shape and aspect ratio (AR) of ten representative insect wings are considered; they are the wings of fruit fly, cranefly, dronefly, hoverfly, ladybird, bumblebee, honeybee, lacewing (forewing), hawkmoth and dragonfly (forewing), respectively (AR of these wings varies greatly, from 2.84 to 5.45). The following facts are shown. (1) The corrugated and flat-plate wings produce approximately the same aerodynamic forces. This is because for a sweeping wing at large angle of attack, the length scale of the corrugation is much smaller than the size of the separated flow region or the size of the leading edge vortex (LEV). (2) The variation in wing shape can have considerable effects on the aerodynamic force; but it has only minor effects on the force coefficients when the velocity at r 2 (the radius of the second moment of wing area) is used as the reference velocity; i.e. the force coefficients are almost unaffected by the variation in wing shape. (3) The effects of AR are remarkably small: when AR increases from 2.8 to 5.5, the force coefficients vary only slightly; flowfield results show that when AR is relatively large, the part of the LEV on the outer part of the wings sheds during the sweeping motion. As AR is increased, on one hand, the force coefficients will be increased due to the reduction of 3-dimensional flow effects; on the other hand, they will be decreased due to the shedding of part of the LEV; these two effects approximately cancel each other, resulting in only minor change of the force coefficients.

Keywords

Insect flight Sweeping wing Unsteady aerodynamics Wing corrugation Planform 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Institute of Fluid MechanicsBeihang UniversityBeijingChina

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