Advertisement

Inertial lateral migration and self-assembly of particles in bidisperse suspensions in microchannel flows

  • Yanfeng Gao
  • Pascale Magaud
  • Christine Lafforgue
  • Stéphane Colin
  • Lucien BaldasEmail author
Research Paper
  • 156 Downloads

Abstract

Inertial focusing of particles in microchannels has demonstrated a great potential for a wide range of applications addressing various challenges, such as clinical diagnosis, biological assay, water treatment, etc. Even though numerous theoretical, numerical and experimental studies have been performed to identify the physical mechanisms underlying the migration of particles in confined environments, only a few works, up to now, have been devoted to the effects resulting from the interactions between particles of different sizes in polydisperse suspensions. In this work, high-speed bright-field imaging was used to experimentally analyse the behaviour of model bidisperse suspensions. The influences of bidispersity on (1) the lateral inertial migration of the particles towards equilibrium positions within the channel cross-section and (2) their longitudinal ordering into trains in the flow direction, were investigated under different conditions by varying the Reynolds number, the particles’ size ratios and concentrations. The quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of the experimental data show that the bidispersity can modify not only the lateral migration process but also the sequential particle-ordering phenomenon.

Keywords

Microfluidics Bidisperse suspensions Separation Inertial focusing Particle-laden flows 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was partly supported by the Fédération de Recherche FERMaT, FR 3089, Université de Toulouse, France and the China Scholarship Council (CSC N° 201304490076).

Supplementary material

10404_2019_2262_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3.1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 3183 kb)
10404_2019_2262_MOESM2_ESM.rar (3.6 mb)
Supplementary material 2 (RAR 3716 kb)
10404_2019_2262_MOESM3_ESM.rar (4.6 mb)
Supplementary material 3 (RAR 4670 kb)

References

  1. Abbas M, Magaud P, Gao Y, Geoffroy S (2014) Migration of finite sized particles in a laminar square channel flow from low to high Reynolds numbers. Phys Fluids 26:123301CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amini H, Sollier E, Weaver WM, Di Carlo D (2012) Intrinsic particle-induced lateral transport in microchannels. Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:11593–11598CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Amini H, Lee W, Di Carlo D (2014) Inertial microfluidic physics. Lab Chip 14:2739–2761CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Asmolov ES (1999) The inertial lift on a spherical particle in a plane Poiseuille flow at large channel Reynolds number. J Fluid Mech 381:63–87CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bhagat AAS, Kuntaegowdanahalli SS, Papautsky I (2009) Inertial microfluidics for continuous particle filtration and extraction. Microfluid Nanofluid 7:217–226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Chen Y et al (2014) Rare cell isolation and analysis in microfluidics. Lab Chip 14:626–645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Choi Y-S, Seo K-W, Lee S-J (2011) Lateral and cross-lateral focusing of spherical particles in a square microchannel. Lab Chip 11:460–465CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ciftlik AT, Ettori M, Gijs MA (2013) High throughput-per-footprint inertial focusing. Small 9:2764–2773CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Di Carlo D, Irimia D, Tompkins RG, Toner M (2007) Continuous inertial focusing, ordering, and separation of particles in microchannels. Proc Natl Acad Sci 104:18892–18897CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Di Carlo D, Edd JF, Humphry KJ, Stone HA, Toner M (2009) Particle segregation and dynamics in confined flows. Phys Rev Lett 102:094503CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Edd JF, Di Carlo D, Humphry KJ, Köster S, Irimia D, Weitz DA, Toner M (2008) Controlled encapsulation of single-cells into monodisperse picolitre drops. Lab Chip 8:1262–1264CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Feng J, Hu HH, Joseph DD (1994) Direct simulation of initial value problems for the motion of solid bodies in a Newtonian fluid. Part 2. Couette and Poiseuille flows. J Fluid Mech 277:271–301CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Gao Y, Magaud P, Baldas L, Lafforgue C, Abbas M, Colin S (2017) Self-ordered particle trains in inertial microchannel flows. Microfluid Nanofluid 21:154CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gupta A, Magaud P, Lafforgue C, Abbas M (2018) Conditional stability of particle alignment in finite-Reynolds-number channel flow. Phys Rev Fluids 3:114302CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hood K, Lee S, Roper M (2015) Inertial migration of a rigid sphere in three-dimensional Poiseuille flow. J Fluid Mech 765:452–479MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hood K, Kahkeshani S, Di Carlo D, Roper M (2016) Direct measurement of particle inertial migration in rectangular microchannels. Lab Chip 16:2840–2850CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Humphry KJ, Kulkarni PM, Weitz DA, Morris JF, Stone HA (2010) Axial and lateral particle ordering in finite Reynolds number channel flows. Phys Fluids 22:081703CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hur SC, Tse HTK, Di Carlo D (2010) Sheathless inertial cell ordering for extreme throughput flow cytometry. Lab Chip 10:274–280CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hur SC, Choi S-E, Kwon S, Carlo DD (2011a) Inertial focusing of non-spherical microparticles. Appl Phys Lett 99:044101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hur SC, Henderson-MacLennan NK, McCabe ER, Di Carlo D (2011b) Deformability-based cell classification and enrichment using inertial microfluidics. Lab Chip 11:912–920CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Kahkeshani S, Haddadi H, Di Carlo D (2016) Preferred interparticle spacings in trains of particles in inertial microchannel flows. J Fluid Mech 786:R3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Kim YW, Yoo JY (2008) The lateral migration of neutrally-buoyant spheres transported through square microchannels. J Micromech Microeng 18:065015CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Krishnan GP, Beimfohr S, Leighton DT (1996) Shear-induced radial segregation in bidisperse suspensions. J Fluid Mech 321:371–393CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Lee W, Amini H, Stone HA, Di Carlo D (2010) Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals. Proc Natl Acad Sci 107:22413–22418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Lim EJ, Ober TJ, Edd JF, McKinley GH, Toner M (2012) Visualization of microscale particle focusing in diluted and whole blood using particle trajectory analysis. Lab Chip 12:2199–2210CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Lyon M, Leal L (1998) An experimental study of the motion of concentrated suspensions in two-dimensional channel flow. Part 2. Bidisperse systems. J Fluid Mech 363:57–77CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Mach AJ, Di Carlo D (2010) Continuous scalable blood filtration device using inertial microfluidics. Biotechnol Bioeng 107:302–311CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Martel JM, Toner M (2013) Particle focusing in curved microfluidic channels. Sci Rep 3:3340CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Martel JM, Toner M (2014) Inertial focusing in microfluidics. Annu Rev Biomed Eng 16:371–396CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Matas J-P, Glezer V, Guazzelli É, Morris JF (2004a) Trains of particles in finite-Reynolds-number pipe flow. Phys Fluids 16:4192–4195CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Matas J-P, Morris JF, Guazzelli É (2004b) Inertial migration of rigid spherical particles in Poiseuille flow. J Fluid Mech 515:171–195CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Miura K, Itano T, Sugihara-Seki M (2014) Inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spheres in a pressure-driven flow through square channels. J Fluid Mech 749:320–330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Morley ST, Newport DT, Walsh MT (2017) Towards the prediction of flow-induced shear stress distributions experienced by breast cancer cells in the lymphatics. Biomech Model Mechanobiol 16:2051–2062CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Nakagawa N, Yabu T, Otomo R, Kase A, Makino M, Itano T, Sugihara-Seki M (2015) Inertial migration of a spherical particle in laminar square channel flows from low to high Reynolds numbers. J Fluid Mech 779:776–793MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Sajeesh P, Sen AK (2014) Particle separation and sorting in microfluidic devices: a review. Microfluid Nanofluid 17:1–52CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Segre G, Silberberg A (1962) Behaviour of macroscopic rigid spheres in Poiseuille flow Part 2. Experimental results and interpretation. J Fluid Mech 14:136–157CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Shichi H, Yamashita H, Seki J, Itano T, Sugihara-Seki M (2017) Inertial migration regimes of spherical particles suspended in square tube flows. Phys Rev Fluids 2:044201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Sollier E, Amini H, Go DE, Sandoz PA, Owsley K, Di Carlo D (2015) Inertial microfluidic programming of microparticle-laden flows for solution transfer around cells and particles. Microfluid Nanofluid 19:53–65CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Van Dinther AMC, Schroën CGPH, Imhof A, Vollebregt HM, Boom RM (2013) Flow-induced particle migration in microchannels for improved microfiltration processes. Microfluid Nanofluid 15:451–465CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Vollebregt HM, van der Sman RGM, Boom RM (2012) Model for particle migration in bidisperse suspensions by use of effective temperature. Faraday Discuss 158:89–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Xiang N, Chen K, Dai Q, Jiang D, Sun D, Ni Z (2015) Inertia-induced focusing dynamics of microparticles throughout a curved microfluidic channel. Microfluid Nanofluid 18:29–39CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Zhang J, Yan S, Yuan D, Alici G, Nguyen NT, Ebrahimi Warkiani M, Li W (2016) Fundamentals and applications of inertial microfluidics: a review. Lab Chip 16:10–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Zhou J, Papautsky I (2013) Fundamentals of inertial focusing in microchannels. Lab Chip 13:1121–1132CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Zhou J, Giridhar PV, Kasper S, Papautsky I (2013) Modulation of aspect ratio for complete separation in an inertial microfluidic channel. Lab Chip 13:1919–1929CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institut Clément Ader (ICA), CNRS, INSA, ISAE-SUPAERO, Mines-Albi, UPSUniversité de ToulouseToulouseFrance
  2. 2.Université de LimogesLimogesFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes Biologiques et des Procédées (LISBP), CNRS, INRA, INSAUniversité de ToulouseToulouseFrance

Personalised recommendations