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Journal of Medical Ultrasonics

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 219–224 | Cite as

Ultrasonographic thyroid nodular findings in Japanese children

  • Nobuyuki Taniguchi
  • Naomi Hayashida
  • Hiroki Shimura
  • Noriyuki Okubo
  • Yasushi Asari
  • Takeshi Nigawara
  • Sanae Midorikawa
  • Kazuhiko Kotani
  • Shigeyuki Nakaji
  • Misa Imaizumi
  • Akira Ohtsuru
  • Takashi Akamizu
  • Masafumi Kitaoka
  • Shinichi Suzuki
  • Shunichi Yamashita
  • Noboru Takamura
  • The Investigation Committee for the Proportion of Thyroid Ultrasound Findings
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

The Fukushima Health Management Survey conducted after the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant included thyroid ultrasound examinations for children aged ≤18 years at the time of the accident. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of thyroid nodular lesions detected using high-quality ultrasonography in a general population of Japanese children, in whom such data have not been previously characterized.

Methods

The current study investigated 4,365 free-living children aged between 3 and 18 years in three Japanese prefectures (Aomori, Yamanashi and Nagasaki). The same ultrasonography equipment as that used in the Fukushima Survey was employed to observe thyroid nodular lesions. The following categories of findings were used—‘A’, further examinations are not necessary; ‘B’, the presence of thyroid nodules with a diameter of ≥5.1 mm or thyroid cysts with a diameter of ≥20.1 mm; and ‘C’, immediate further examinations are required. As a sub-category of ‘A’, ‘A1’ was defined as the absence of nodules or cysts, and ‘A2’ was defined as the presence of thyroid nodules with a diameter of ≤5.0 mm or thyroid cysts with a diameter of ≤20.0 mm.

Results

Overall, 4,321 (99 %) of the total participants were classified with a status of ‘A’ and 44 (1 %) were classified with a status of ‘B’. No participants were classified with a status of ‘C’. A total of 56.5 % of the total participants was classified with a status of ‘A2’. Thyroid nodules were identified in 1.6 % of the total participants and thyroid cysts were identified in 56.9 % of the participants.

Conclusion

The current study provides data regarding the actual frequency of ultrasonographically detected thyroid nodular lesions among the Japanese children. These results would be useful for evaluating thyroid findings in Japanese children, although careful interpretation is required.

Keywords

Thyroid ultrasonography Children Thyroid cyst Thyroid nodule Nodular thyroid lesion 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Ministry of Environment of Japan. We would like to thank Mr. Yasuo Kiryu, Ms. Yoshie Hirose, Ms. Akemi Kiko, Ms. Kyoko Takemura, Ms. Misako Konta, and Ms. Michiko Kenmoku for their valuable assistance with the study.

Conflict of interest

This study was funded by the Ministry of Environment of Japan. No authors have any conflicts of interest regarding the current study.

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Copyright information

© The Japan Society of Ultrasonics in Medicine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuyuki Taniguchi
    • 1
  • Naomi Hayashida
    • 2
  • Hiroki Shimura
    • 4
  • Noriyuki Okubo
    • 5
  • Yasushi Asari
    • 6
  • Takeshi Nigawara
    • 7
  • Sanae Midorikawa
    • 8
  • Kazuhiko Kotani
    • 1
  • Shigeyuki Nakaji
    • 5
  • Misa Imaizumi
    • 10
  • Akira Ohtsuru
    • 8
  • Takashi Akamizu
    • 11
  • Masafumi Kitaoka
    • 12
  • Shinichi Suzuki
    • 9
  • Shunichi Yamashita
    • 3
    • 13
  • Noboru Takamura
    • 2
  • The Investigation Committee for the Proportion of Thyroid Ultrasound Findings
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Laboratory MedicineJichi Medical UniversityShimotsukeJapan
  2. 2.Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease InstituteNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  3. 3.Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease InstituteNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Internal Medicine, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and EngineeringUniversity of YamanashiYamanashiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Social MedicineHirosaki University Graduate School of MedicineAomoriJapan
  6. 6.Department of Emergency and Disaster MedicineHirosaki University Graduate School of MedicineAomoriJapan
  7. 7.Department of Endocrinology and MetabolismHirosaki University Graduate School of MedicineAomoriJapan
  8. 8.Department of Radiation Health ManagementFukushima Medical UniversityFukushimaJapan
  9. 9.Department of Organ Regulator SurgeryFukushima Medical UniversityFukushimaJapan
  10. 10.Department of Clinical StudiesRadiation Effects Research FoundationNagasakiJapan
  11. 11.The First Department of MedicineWakayama Medical UniversityWakayamaJapan
  12. 12.Division of Endocrinology and MetabolismShowa General HospitalTokyoJapan
  13. 13.Radiation Science Center for Fukushima Health Management SurveyFukushima Medical UniversityFukushimaJapan

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