EcoHealth

, 4:125

Spread of Chytridiomycosis Has Caused the Rapid Global Decline and Extinction of Frogs

  • Lee Francis Skerratt
  • Lee Berger
  • Richard Speare
  • Scott Cashins
  • Keith Raymond McDonald
  • Andrea Dawn Phillott
  • Harry Bryan Hines
  • Nicole Kenyon
Article

Abstract

The global emergence and spread of the pathogenic, virulent, and highly transmissible fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, resulting in the disease chytridiomycosis, has caused the decline or extinction of up to about 200 species of frogs. Key postulates for this theory have been completely or partially fulfilled. In the absence of supportive evidence for alternative theories despite decades of research, it is important for the scientific community and conservation agencies to recognize and manage the threat of chytridiomycosis to remaining species of frogs, especially those that are naive to the pathogen. The impact of chytridiomycosis on frogs is the most spectacular loss of vertebrate biodiversity due to disease in recorded history.

Keywords

chytridiomycosis Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis decline extinction frogs amphibians postulates global 

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Copyright information

© Ecohealth Journal Consortium 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Francis Skerratt
    • 1
  • Lee Berger
    • 2
  • Richard Speare
    • 2
  • Scott Cashins
    • 3
  • Keith Raymond McDonald
    • 4
  • Andrea Dawn Phillott
    • 1
  • Harry Bryan Hines
    • 5
  • Nicole Kenyon
    • 3
  1. 1.Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Veterinary and Biomedical SciencesJames Cook UniversityQueenslandAustralia
  2. 2.Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation SciencesJames Cook UniversityQueenslandAustralia
  3. 3.Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Tropical BiologyJames Cook UniversityQueenslandAustralia
  4. 4.Amphibian Disease Ecology GroupQueensland Parks and Wildlife ServiceQueenslandAustralia
  5. 5.Queensland Parks and Wildlife ServiceQueenslandAustralia

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