EcoHealth

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 11–16 | Cite as

Systemwide Initiative on Malaria and Agriculture: AnInnovative Framework for Research and Capacity Building

  • Clifford M. Mutero
  • Felix Amerasinghe
  • Eline Boelee
  • Flemming Konradsen
  • Wim van der Hoek
  • Tendani Nevondo
  • Frank Rijsberman
Profile

Abstract

The Systemwide Initiative on Malaria and Agriculture (SIMA) is an initiative of international agricultural research centers to promote research and capacity building on the links between malaria and agriculture and to validate innovative interventions that would strengthen and complement existing malaria-control strategies in clearly defined settings. Knowledge regarding the nature and dynamics of agroecosystems is particularly needed for the purpose of developing appropriate farmer-managed preventive measures against malaria. SIMA research aims to make use of new and existing information on biomedical and socioeconomic determinants of malaria risks in formulating and evaluating the feasibility of integrated strategies. The initiative is especially interested and proactive in promoting and facilitating transdisciplinary and participatory research in relation to malaria. The convening institute for SIMA is the International Water Management Institute at its Africa Regional Office in Pretoria, South Africa. This article outlines SIMA’s objectives and scope of activities and also highlights achievements, challenges, and opportunities for future collaboration.

Key words

malaria agriculture Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research systemwide initiative on malaria and agriculture ecosystem approach to human health 

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Copyright information

© EcoHealth Journal Consortium 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clifford M. Mutero
    • 1
  • Felix Amerasinghe
    • 2
  • Eline Boelee
    • 3
  • Flemming Konradsen
    • 2
    • 4
  • Wim van der Hoek
    • 2
  • Tendani Nevondo
    • 1
  • Frank Rijsberman
    • 2
  1. 1.International Water Management Institute (IWMI)PretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.IWMIColomboSri Lanka
  3. 3.IWMIAddis Ababa
  4. 4.Department of International HealthInstitute of Public HealthCopenhagen NDenmark

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