Journal of Public Health

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 53–57 | Cite as

Evidence-based physical activity promotion - HEPA Europe, the European Network for the Promotion of Health-Enhancing Physical Activity

  • Brian W. Martin
  • Sonja Kahlmeier
  • Francesca Racioppi
  • Finn Berggren
  • Mari Miettinen
  • Jean-Michel Oppert
  • Harry Rutter
  • Radim Šlachta
  • Mireille van Poppel
  • Jozica Maucec Zakotnik
  • Dirk Meusel
  • Pekka Oja
  • Michael Sjöström
Review Article

Abstract

There has been a world-wide increase in scientific interest in health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA). The importance of a physically active lifestyle has now been well established both on the individual and on the population level. At the same time, physical inactivity has become a global problem. While sports for all has a long history, only a few examples of long-term integrated physical activity promotion strategies have been in place in Europe until recently, namely in Finland, the Netherlands and England. A number of countries have now begun to develop their own activities. However, there has been a noticeable lack of a platform for sharing the development and implementation of evidence-based policies and strategies. In order to fill this gap, HEPA Europe, the European Network for the Promotion of Health-Enhancing Physical Activity, was founded in May 2005 in Gerlev, Denmark. The goal of the network is to strengthen and support efforts and actions that increase participation in physical activity and improve the conditions favourable to a healthy lifestyle, in particular with respect to HEPA. The Network is working closely with the WHO Regional Office for Europe (http://www.euro.who.int/hepa). The network focuses on population-based approaches for the promotion of HEPA, using the best-available scientific evidence, and is currently implementing its first projects. HEPA Europe has established collaboration with EU Commission projects and Agita Mundo. Priorities for future work have been defined, and interested organisations and institutions have the opportunity to join the network and participate in the process.

Keywords

Physical activity Public health Prevention Health promotion 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian W. Martin
    • 1
  • Sonja Kahlmeier
    • 2
  • Francesca Racioppi
    • 2
  • Finn Berggren
    • 3
  • Mari Miettinen
    • 4
  • Jean-Michel Oppert
    • 5
  • Harry Rutter
    • 6
  • Radim Šlachta
    • 7
  • Mireille van Poppel
    • 8
  • Jozica Maucec Zakotnik
    • 9
  • Dirk Meusel
    • 10
  • Pekka Oja
    • 11
    • 12
  • Michael Sjöström
    • 1
  1. 1.Physical Activity and Health Branch, Swiss Federal Institute of Sports MagglingenSwiss Federal Office of SportsMagglingenSwitzerland
  2. 2.WHO, European Centre for Environment and HealthRome OfficeRomeItaly
  3. 3.Gerlev PE and Sports AcademyGerlevDenmark
  4. 4.Ministry of Social Affairs and HealthHelsinkiFinland
  5. 5.University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6ParisFrance
  6. 6.South East Public Health GroupLondonUK
  7. 7.Faculty of Physical CulturePalacky UniversityOlomoucCzech Republic
  8. 8.VU University Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  9. 9.Countrywide Integrated Noncommunicable Diseases Intervention Programme (CINDI)LjublijanaSlovenia
  10. 10.Dresden Technische Universität Dresden, Research Association Public Health Saxony and Saxonx-AnhaltDresdenGermany
  11. 11.UKK InstituteTampereFinland
  12. 12.Karolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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