Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 124–128 | Cite as

Bevacizumab treatment for choroidal neovascularization due to age-related macular degeneration in Japanese patients

  • Mihoko Suzuki
  • Fumi Gomi
  • Miki Sawa
  • Motokazu Tsujikawa
  • Hirokazu Sakaguchi
Clinical Investigation

Abstract

Purpose

To assess intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Japanese patients.

Methods

Forty-seven patients treated with IVB for newly diagnosed subfoveal or juxtafoveal CNV (predominantly classic CNV, 15 eyes; minimally classic CNV, 11 eyes; occult CNV, 21 eyes) secondary to AMD and followed for more than 12 months were reviewed retrospectively. IVB (1 mg) was injected via the pars plana. Additional IVB or photodynamic therapy was administered for either persistent or recurrent exudation. The main outcome measurements were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of injections, and treatment other than bevacizumab.

Results

The mean baseline visual acuity (VA) was 0.38 [logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR), 0.42] and final VA was 0.42 (logMAR, 0.38). During 12 months, bevacizumab was injected a mean of 3.4 times. Eight eyes received additional treatment. Up until 12 months, the mean BCVA with predominantly classic CNV increased, whereas the BCVA with minimally classic or occult with no classic CNV stabilized. The mean number of injections for predominantly classic CNV was 2.5, that for minimally classic CNV was 4.9, and that for occult with no classic CNV was 3.3.

Conclusions

IVB was especially effective for predominantly classic CNV, but CNV with subretinal pigment epithelial lesions might recur or enlarge despite additional IVB.

Keywords

age-related macular degeneration bevacizumab choroidal neovascularization 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Ophthalmological Society (JOS) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mihoko Suzuki
    • 1
  • Fumi Gomi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Miki Sawa
    • 1
  • Motokazu Tsujikawa
    • 1
  • Hirokazu Sakaguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyOsaka University Medical SchoolSuitaJapan
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyOsaka University Medical SchoolSuitaJapan

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