Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 125–130

Comparing outcomes in patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration treated with two different doses of primary intravitreal bevacizumab: results of the pan-american collaborative retina study group (PACORES) at the 12-month follow-up

  • Lihteh Wu
  • J. Fernando Arevalo
  • Mauricio Maia
  • Maria H. Berrocal
  • Juan Sanchez
  • Teodoro Evans
  • the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES)
Clinical Investigation

Abstract

Purpose

To compare the total number of injections and the anatomic and best-corrected visual acuity (VA) response after injecting 1.25 or 2.5 mg of bevacizumab as needed in patients with primary choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at 12 months.

Methods

This was a retrospective, interventional, comparative multicenter study of 60 eyes treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (35 eyes, 1.25 mg; 25 eyes, 2.5 mg).

Results

The mean number of injections per eye was 3.8 in the 1.25-mg group and 3.2 in the 2.5-mg group (P = 0.2752). At 12 months, in the 1.25-mg group, 16 (46%) eyes gained ≥3 lines of Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) VA and seven (20%) lost ≥3 lines of ETDRS VA. In the 2.5-mg group, 11 (44%) eyes improved by ≥3 lines, and four (16%) lost ≥3 lines (P = 1.000). At 12 months, in the 1.25-mg group, the mean central macular thickness decreased from 419 ± 201 μm at baseline to 268 ± 96 μm, compared with a decrease from 388 ± 162 to 296 ± 114 μm in the 2.5-mg group (P = 0.7896).

Conclusion

There were no statistically significant differences between the two dose groups with regard to the number of injections, anatomic and VA outcomes.

Key Words

age-related macular degeneration bevacizumab choroidal neovascularization VEGF 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Ophthalmological Society (JOS) 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lihteh Wu
    • 1
    • 5
  • J. Fernando Arevalo
    • 2
  • Mauricio Maia
    • 3
  • Maria H. Berrocal
    • 4
  • Juan Sanchez
    • 2
  • Teodoro Evans
    • 1
  • the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES)
  1. 1.Instituto de Cirugia OcularSan JoseCosta Rica
  2. 2.Retina and Vitreous ServiceClinica Oftalmológica Centro CaracasCaracasVenezuela
  3. 3.Departamento de Oftalmologia, Instituto da VisãoUniversidade Federal de São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  4. 4.University of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  5. 5.San JoseCosta Rica

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