Advertisement

Hematology and serum biochemistry of European mouflon (Ovis orientalis musimon) in Croatia

  • Tomislav Mašek
  • Dean Konjević
  • Krešimir Severin
  • Zdravko Janicki
  • Marijan Grubešić
  • Krešimir Krapinec
  • Jelena Bojanc
  • Željko Mikulec
  • Alen Slavica
Original Paper

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine the reference intervals for the most commonly used hematological and biochemical parameters of European mouflon from a closed hunting ground in the eastern part of the Republic of Croatia. Blood samples were collected from 39 live, physically restrained, clinically normal European mouflon, as well as from 50 domestic sheep. The distribution of values within each parameter was determined and statistical differences in values between sexes were also determined. For each sample, 14 hematological and 18 biochemical parameters were analyzed. Hematology and biochemistry values of the European mouflon were also compared with the values of domestic sheep. In further studies, the established values might be useful for the health assessment of mouflon.

Keywords

Blood parameters Domestic sheep Handling stress Mouflon Sex effects 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The study was supported by the Ministry of Science, Education, and Sport of the Republic of Croatia, in the projects: No. 053-0532265-2244 and No. 053-0532400-2399. This research complies with current laws of the Republic of Croatia.

References

  1. Alstrom T, Glasbeck R, Hjelm M, Skandsen S (1975) Recommendation concerning the collection of reference values in clinical chemistry and activity report. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 35:3–44. doi: 10.3109/00365517509108157 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Borjesson DL, Christopher MM, Boyce WM (2000) Biochemical and hematologic reference intervals for free-ranging desert Bighorn sheep. J Wildl Dis 36:294–300PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Cattet MRL, Christison K, Caulkett NA, Stenhouse GB (2003) Physiologic responses of grizzly bears to different methods of capture. J Wildl Dis 39:649–654PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Chalmers GA, Barrett MW (1977) Capture myopathy in pronghorns in Alberta, Canada. J Am Vet Med Assoc 171:918–923PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Cross JP, Mackintosh CG, Griffin JFT (1988) Effects of physical restraint and xylazine sedation on haematological values in red deer (Cervus elaphus). Res Vet Sci 45:281–286PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Dubreuil P, Arsenault J, Belanger D (2005) Biochemical reference ranges for groups of ewes of different age. Vet Rec 156:636–638PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Finco DR (1997) Kidney function. In: Kaneko JJ, Harvey JW, Bruss ML (eds) Clinical biochemistry of domestic animals, 5th edn. Academic, San Diego, pp 441–484Google Scholar
  8. Foreyt WJ, Smith TC, Evermann JF, Heimer WE (1983) Hematologic, serum chemistry and serologic values of Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) in Alaska. J Wildl Dis 19:136–139PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Franzmann AW (1971) Comparative physiologic values in captive and wild Bighorn sheep. J Wildl Dis 7:105–108PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Harthoon AM (1976) Physiology of capture myopathy. Quinquennial report. Transvaal Nature Conservation division, Pretoria, South AfricaGoogle Scholar
  11. Hawkey CM, Hart MG, Fitzgerald AK (1984) Haematological values in mouflon (Ovis musimon): influence of age, sex, season and vitamin E status. Res Vet Sci 36:37–42PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Kaneko JJ, Harvey JW, Bruss ML (1997) Clinical biochemistry of domestic animals, Appendix VII, 5th edn. Academic, San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  13. Knowles TG, Warris PD (2000) Stress physiology of animals during transport. In: Grandin T (ed) Livestock handling and transport, 2nd edn. CABI, Wallingford, pp 385–407Google Scholar
  14. Konjević D, Krapinec K (2006) Mouflon (Ovis amon musimon, Pallas) on Croatian islands—from potential to unwanted game. Hrvatski veterinarski vjesnik 29:279–284 (In Croatian)Google Scholar
  15. Marco I, Vinas L, Velarde R, Pastor J, Lavin S (1997) Effects of capture and transport on blood parameters in free-ranging Mouflon (Ovis ammon). J Zoo Wildl Med 28:428–433PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Marco I, Vinas L, Velarde R, Pastor J, Lavin S (1998) The stress response to repeated capture in Mouflon (Ovis ammon)—physiological, haematological and biochemical parameters. Zentralbl Veterinarmed [A] 45:243–253Google Scholar
  17. Martucci RW, Jessup DA, Gronert GA, Reitan JA, Clark WE (1992) Blood gas and catecholamine levels in capture stressed Desert bighorn sheep. J Wildl Dis 28:250–254PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Masek T, Mikulec Z, Valpotic H, Pahovic S (2007) Blood biochemical parameters of crossbred Istrian × East Friesian dairy ewes: relation to milking period. Ital J Anim Sci 6:281–288Google Scholar
  19. Peinado VI, Celdran JF, Palomeque J (1999) Basic hematological values in some wild ruminants in captivity. Comp Biochem Physiol 124:199–203. doi: 10.1016/S1095-6433(99)00110-5 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Perez JM, Gonzalez FJ, Granados JE, Perez MC, Fandos P, Soriguer RC, Serrano E (2003) Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals for Spanish ibex. J Wildl Dis 39:209–215PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Refsum HE, Stromme SB (1974) Urea and creatinine production and excretion in urine during and after prolonged heavy exercise. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 33:247–254. doi: 10.3109/00365517409082493 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Roubies N, Panousis N, Fyitianou A, Katsoulos PD, Giadinis N, Karatzias H (2006) Effects of age and reproductive stage on certain serum biochemical parameters of Chios sheep under Greek rearing conditions. J Vet Med A 53:277–281. doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0442.2006.00832.x CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. SAS (1991) SAS User’s guide: statistics, version 6. Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USAGoogle Scholar
  24. Smith BP (2002) Large animal internal medicine, 3rd edn. Mosby, Philadelphia, pp 1736–1737Google Scholar
  25. Solberg EH (1999) Chemometrics, statistical treatment of reference intervals. In: Burtiss CA, Ashwood ER (eds) Tietz textbook of clinical chemistry, 3rd edn. Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 336–356Google Scholar
  26. Tschuor AC, Riondl B, Braun U, Lutzl H (2008) Hämatologische und klinisch-chemische Referenzwerte für adulte Ziegen und Schafe Schweiz. Arch Tierheilk 150:287–295. doi: 10.1024/0036-7281.150.6.287 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Volmer K, Hecht W (2006) Disease monitoring in European mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon) populations by clinical blood tests—aspects of epidemiology and treatment control of claw diseases. Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 119:410–415PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Wolkers H, Wensing T, Schonewille JT (1994) Effects of undernutrition on hematological and serum biochemical characteristics in red deer (Cervus elaphus). Can J Zool 72:1291–1296. doi: 10.1139/z94-172 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Yokus B, Cakir UD (2006) Seasonal and physiological variations in serum chemistry and mineral concentrations in cattle. Biol Trace Elem Res 109:255–266. doi: 10.1385/BTER:109:3:255 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomislav Mašek
    • 1
    • 5
  • Dean Konjević
    • 2
  • Krešimir Severin
    • 2
  • Zdravko Janicki
    • 2
  • Marijan Grubešić
    • 3
  • Krešimir Krapinec
    • 3
  • Jelena Bojanc
    • 4
  • Željko Mikulec
    • 1
  • Alen Slavica
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Animal Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  2. 2.Department for Game Biology, Pathology and Breeding, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  3. 3.Department for Forest Protection & Wildlife Management, Faculty of ForestryUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  4. 4.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  5. 5.Department of Animal NutritionFaculty of Veterinary MedicineZagrebCroatia

Personalised recommendations