European Journal of Wildlife Research

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 239–246 | Cite as

Reproductive potential of domestic Ovis aries for preservation of threatened Ovis orientalis isphahanica: in vitro and in vivo studies

  • S. M. Hosseini
  • M. Fazilati
  • F. Moulavi
  • M. Foruzanfar
  • M. Hajian
  • P. Abedi
  • N. Nasiri
  • A. K. Kaveh
  • A. H. Shahverdi
  • M. R. Hemami
  • M. H. Nasr-Esfahani
Original Paper

Abstract

Although the potential use of reproductive biotechnology for safeguarding of endangered wildlife species is undoubted, initial evaluation of the genetic and reproductive relationship between the endangered mammals and those closely related species is indispensable. Isfahan mouflon Ovis orientalis isphahanica is now considered as a threatened species by International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Therefore, little is known about the biology of this species. This study was carried out to investigate the possible reproductive potential of domestic sheep for ex situ conservation of the Isfahan mouflon. Somatic cell cultures were taken from ear biopsies of the wild and domestic sheep and were used for karyotype analysis. Semen samples were collected by electroejaculator from the wild and domestic rams. The spermatological characteristics of the collected semen samples were determined and used for both cryopreservation and cross-insemination of the synchronized wild and domestic female sheep. To establish a cryobank for the threatened species biomaterials, freezed samples of the somatic cells and semen were transferred to a cryotank. The result suggested that Isfahan mouflon has conserved its chromosomal integrity as previously observed and contains the same chromosomal number as the domestic sheep (2n = 54). The semen samples of both species revealed similar cryoviability (>35% gross motility postthawing). Cross-insemination of both species resulted in successful pregnancy. It was suggested that domestic sheep possesses the required biological characteristics to be considered for safeguarding of the Isfahan mouflon.

Keywords

Isfahan mouflon Ovis orientalis isphahanica Domestic sheep Reproductive potential Karyotype 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was funded by a grant from the Royan Institute of IRI. We would like to gratefully thank Dr. H Gurabi and Dr. A. Vosough for their full supports. We would also like to thanks A. Ghaderi for his kind assistance in keeping the wild sheep.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Hosseini
    • 1
  • M. Fazilati
    • 2
  • F. Moulavi
    • 1
  • M. Foruzanfar
    • 3
  • M. Hajian
    • 1
  • P. Abedi
    • 1
  • N. Nasiri
    • 4
  • A. K. Kaveh
    • 5
  • A. H. Shahverdi
    • 1
    • 6
  • M. R. Hemami
    • 7
  • M. H. Nasr-Esfahani
    • 1
    • 6
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental Embryology, Cell Sciences Research Centre, Royan InstituteACECRTehranIran
  2. 2.Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of AgricultureIsfahan University of TechnologyIsfahanIran
  3. 3.Department of Basic ScienceIslamic Azad University, Marvdasht BranchMarvdashtIran
  4. 4.Food and Drug Engineering GroupNarges-e-Talaii Research CooperationIsfahanIran
  5. 5.Department of EnvironmentIsfahanIran
  6. 6.Department of Clinical and Experimental Embryology, Reproductive Medicine Research Centre, Royan InstituteACECRTehranIran
  7. 7.Department of Natural ResourcesIsfahan University of TechnologyIsfahanIran
  8. 8.Isfahan Fertility and Infertility CenterIsfahanIran

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