Cognitive Processing

, Volume 13, Supplement 1, pp 75–78

Assistive/rehabilitation technology, disability, and service delivery models

  • Meera Adya
  • Deepti Samant
  • Marcia J. Scherer
  • Mary Killeen
  • Michael W. Morris
Short Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10339-012-0466-8

Cite this article as:
Adya, M., Samant, D., Scherer, M.J. et al. Cogn Process (2012) 13(Suppl 1): 75. doi:10.1007/s10339-012-0466-8
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Abstract

The United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals do not explicitly articulate a focus on disability; similar failures in the past resulted in research, policy, and practice that are not generalizable and did not meet the needs of persons with disabilities since they were developed for an “average” population. Academics and professionals in health and other disciplines should have a knowledge base in evidence-based practices that improve well-being and participation of people with disabilities through effective service delivery of assistive technology. Grounded by a theoretical framework that incorporates a multivariate perspective of disability that is acknowledged in the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities and the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, we present a review of models of assistive technology service delivery and call for future syntheses of the fragmented evidence base that would permit a comparative effectiveness approach to evaluation.

Keywords

Assistive technology devices Assistive technology services Disability Rehabilitation Community-based rehabilitation Universal design 

Copyright information

© Marta Olivetti Belardinelli and Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meera Adya
    • 1
  • Deepti Samant
    • 1
  • Marcia J. Scherer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Killeen
    • 1
  • Michael W. Morris
    • 1
  1. 1.Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Matching Person & TechnologyWebsterUSA

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