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Cognitive Processing

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 60–64 | Cite as

News from the roar lab at the ohio state university

  • Mari Riess Jones
  • Ralph Barnes
  • Riccardo Brunetti
  • Robert Ellis
  • Heather Johnston
  • Edward Large
  • Noah MacKenzie
  • Devin McAuley
  • Amandine Penel
  • Jennifer Puente
Laboratory Notes
  • 93 Downloads

Introduction

The ROAR Lab is concerned with research on attentional rhythmicity. It is part of the Psychology Department at The Ohio State University where this lab has been active for over 15 years. Ohio State University is one of the largest state funded universities in the US; it is located in Columbus, Ohio. The department of Psychology at Ohio State comprises about 50 faculty members; of these, eight are current members of the Cognitive Experimental Area. Mari Riess Jones is a Professor in cognitive experimental area of the Department of Psychology; she is also the head of the ROAR Lab. The Cognitive Experimental Area trains both undergraduate psychology majors, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Students and fellows at all these levels participate in the research of the ROAR Lab (http://www.psy.ohio-state.edu/roar/).

Over the last decade many different projects have consumed the interest of ROAR researchers. Much of this research is concerned with perception and...

Keywords

Auditory Dynamic attending Rhythm Pattern 

References

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  12. Large EW, Jones MR (1999) The dynamics of attending: how people track time-varying events. Psychol Rev 106(1):119–159CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. McAuley DJ (1995) Perception of time phase: toward an adaptive oscillator model of rhythmic pattern processing. Unpublished PhD Thesis. Indiana UniversityGoogle Scholar
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  15. McAuley JD, Jones MR, Holub S, Johnston HM, Miller N (2005) Age related slowing and event timing: a lifespan perspective. J Exp Psy G (under review)Google Scholar
  16. McAuley DJ, Kidd GR (1998) Effect of deviations from temporal expectations on tempo discrimination of isochronous tone sequences. J Exp Psy P 24:1786–1800CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Penel A, Jones MR (2005) Speeded detection of a tone embedded in a quasi-isochronous sequence: effects of a task irrelevant temporal regularity. Music Perc 22:371–388CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Marta Olivetti Belardinelli and Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mari Riess Jones
    • 1
  • Ralph Barnes
    • 1
  • Riccardo Brunetti
    • 1
  • Robert Ellis
    • 1
  • Heather Johnston
    • 1
  • Edward Large
    • 1
  • Noah MacKenzie
    • 1
  • Devin McAuley
    • 1
  • Amandine Penel
    • 1
  • Jennifer Puente
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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