Influence of crop establishment methods on yield, economics and water productivity of rice cultivars under upland and lowland production ecologies of Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains

  • Rishi Raj
  • Anil Kumar
  • I. S. Solanki
  • Shiva Dhar
  • Anchal Dass
  • Ashish Kumar Gupta
  • Vikash Kumar
  • C. B. Singh
  • R. K. Jat
  • U. C. Pandey
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10333-017-0598-7

Cite this article as:
Raj, R., Kumar, A., Solanki, I.S. et al. Paddy Water Environ (2017). doi:10.1007/s10333-017-0598-7

Abstract

A field study on assessment of crop establishment methods on yield, economics and water productivity of rice cultivars under upland and lowland production ecologies was conducted during wet seasons (June–November) of 2012 and 2013 in Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains of India. The experiment was laid-out in a split-plot design (SPD) and replicated four times. The main-plot treatments included three crop establishment methods, viz. dry direct-seeded rice (DSR), system of rice intensification (SRI) and puddled transplanted rice (PTR). In sub-plots, five rice cultivars of different groups like aromatic (Improved Pusa Basmati 1 and Pusa Sugandh 5), inbreds (PNR 381 and Pusa 834) and hybrid (Arize 6444) were taken for their evaluations. These two sets of treatments were laid-out simultaneously in two production ecologies, upland and lowland during both years. In general, lowland ecology was found favourable for rice growth and yield and resulted in 13.2% higher grain yield as compared to upland ecology. Rice grown with SRI method produced 19.4 and 7.0% higher grain yield in 2012 and 20.6 and 7.1% higher in 2013, over DSR and PTR. However, PTR yielded 13.1 and 14.5% higher grain over DSR during 2012 and 2013, respectively. On an average, Arize 6444 produced 26.4, 26.9, 28.9 and 54.7% higher grain yield as compared to PS 5, P 834, PNR 381 and IPB1, respectively. Further, the interaction of production ecologies × crop establishment methods revealed that, in upland ecology, SRI recorded significantly higher grain yield as compared to PTR and DSR, but in lowland, grain yield resulting from SRI was similar to the yield obtained with PTR and significantly higher than DSR. The latter two methods (PTR and DSR) yielded alike in lowland ecology in both study years. The production ecologies × crop establishment methods × cultivars interaction on grain yield showed that the growing of Arize 6444 cultivar using SRI method in upland ecology resulted in the higher grain yield (8.87 t/ha). But the cost of production was also highest in SRI followed by PTR and DSR across production ecologies and cultivars. Cultivation of hybrid (Arize 6444) involved higher cost of production than all other cultivars. Irrespective of crop establishment methods and cultivars, gross returns, net returns and B:C ratio were significantly higher in lowland compared to upland ecology. Owing to higher grain yield, SRI method fetched significantly higher gross returns and net returns over PTR and DSR. Average increase in net return with Arize 6444 was 68.8, 41.0, 37.7 and 33.1% over IPB 1, PNR 381, P 834 and PS 5, respectively. There was a saving of 30.7% water in SRI and 19.9% in DSR over PTR under upland ecology. Similarly in lowland ecology, water saving of 30.2% was observed in SRI and 21.2% in DSR over PTR. Due to higher yield and saving on water, SRI returned significantly higher total water productivity (TWP) (5.9 kg/ha-mm) as compared to DSR (3.5 kg/ha-mm) and PTR (3.6 kg/ha-mm) under upland ecology. In lowland ecology, also SRI (6.2 kg/ha-mm) resulted in higher TWP as compared to other two methods. However, DSR gave significantly higher TWP as compared to PTR. Among cultivars, hybrid Arize 6444 recorded the highest TWP in both upland and lowland production ecologies across crop establishment methods. Hence, growing of hybrid Arize 6444 with SRI method can enhance rice productivity and water-use efficiency in lowland and upland production ecologies of Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains and in other similar regions.

Keywords

Dry direct-seeded rice Economics Puddled transplanted rice Production ecologies System of rice intensification Water productivity 

Copyright information

© The International Society of Paddy and Water Environment Engineering and Springer Japan 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rishi Raj
    • 1
  • Anil Kumar
    • 1
  • I. S. Solanki
    • 2
  • Shiva Dhar
    • 1
  • Anchal Dass
    • 1
  • Ashish Kumar Gupta
    • 3
  • Vikash Kumar
    • 5
  • C. B. Singh
    • 3
  • R. K. Jat
    • 4
  • U. C. Pandey
    • 3
  1. 1.ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research InstituteNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Indian Council of Agricultural ResearchNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.ICAR- Indian Agricultural Research Institute Regional StationSamastipurIndia
  4. 4.Bourlaug Institute for South AsiaSamastipurIndia
  5. 5.Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural UniversitySardarkrushinagarIndia

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