Paddy and Water Environment

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 79–87 | Cite as

Assessment of different methods of rice (Oryza sativa. L) cultivation affecting growth parameters, soil chemical, biological, and microbiological properties, water saving, and grain yield in rice–rice system

  • Subramaniam Gopalakrishnan
  • R. Mahender Kumar
  • Pagidi Humayun
  • V. Srinivas
  • B. Ratna Kumari
  • R. Vijayabharathi
  • Amit Singh
  • K. Surekha
  • Ch. Padmavathi
  • N. Somashekar
  • P. Raghuveer Rao
  • P. C. Latha
  • L. V. Subba Rao
  • V. R. Babu
  • B. C. Viraktamath
  • V. Vinod Goud
  • N. Loganandhan
  • Biksham Gujja
  • Om Rupela
Article

Abstract

Field experiments were conducted at DRR farm located at ICRISAT, Patancheru, in sandy clay loam soils during four seasons, Kharif 2008, Rabi 2008–2009, Kharif 2009 and Rabi 2009–2010, to investigate growth parameters, water-saving potential, root characteristics, chemical, biological, and microbial properties of rhizosphere soil, and grain yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) by comparing the plants grown with system of rice intensification (SRI) methods, with organic or organic + inorganic fertilization, against current recommended best management practices (BMP). All the growth parameters including plant height, effective tillers (10–45 %), panicle length, dry matter, root dry weight (24–57 %), and root volume (10–66 %) were found to be significantly higher with in SRI-organic + inorganic over BMP. With SRI-organic fertilization, growth parameters showed inconsistent results; however, root dry weight (3–77 %) and root volume (31–162 %) were found significantly superior compared to BMP. Grain yield was found significantly higher in SRI-organic + inorganic (12–23 and 4–35 % in the Kharif and Rabi seasons, respectively), while with SRI-organic management, yield was found higher (4–34 %) only in the Rabi seasons compared to BMP. An average of 31 and 37 % of irrigation water were saved during Kharif and Rabi seasons, respectively, with both SRI methods of rice cultivation compared to BMP. Further, total nitrogen, organic carbon%, soil dehydrogenase, microbial biomass carbon, total bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were found higher in the two SRI plots in comparison to BMP. It is concluded that SRI practices create favorable conditions for beneficial soil microbes to prosper, save irrigation water, and increase grain yield.

Keywords

Methods of rice cultivation System of rice intensification (SRI) Microbial characteristics Root characteristics Irrigation water 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Subramaniam Gopalakrishnan
    • 1
  • R. Mahender Kumar
    • 2
  • Pagidi Humayun
    • 1
  • V. Srinivas
    • 1
  • B. Ratna Kumari
    • 1
  • R. Vijayabharathi
    • 1
  • Amit Singh
    • 3
  • K. Surekha
    • 2
  • Ch. Padmavathi
    • 2
  • N. Somashekar
    • 2
  • P. Raghuveer Rao
    • 2
  • P. C. Latha
    • 2
  • L. V. Subba Rao
    • 2
  • V. R. Babu
    • 2
  • B. C. Viraktamath
    • 2
  • V. Vinod Goud
    • 1
  • N. Loganandhan
    • 1
  • Biksham Gujja
    • 1
  • Om Rupela
    • 1
  1. 1.International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)PatancheruIndia
  2. 2.Directorate of Rice Research (DRR)HyderabadIndia
  3. 3.Department of Plant BreedingCCS Haryana Agricultural UniversityHisarIndia

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